It’s a 64bit 8 GB machine. BSDs work differently:

http://www.freebsd.org/doc/en_US.ISO8859-1/books/handbook/basics-processeshtml

Maximum seems to be 99999, at least on FreeBSD.

On 06 Aug 2014, at 23:09, Henrik Sarvell <hsarv...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hi Jorge, how much RAM does it have, is it a 64bit machine?
> 
> I have checked the number Alex mentioned on some of our servers, all
> running Ubuntu 12.04, servers below 64GB RAM have that number set to
> 32768 per default, machines with 128GB got 98304.
> 
> On Thu, Aug 7, 2014 at 12:49 PM, Jorge Acereda Maciá <jacer...@gmail.com> 
> wrote:
>> I’m getting pids well above 64k on my laptop (OS X).
>> 
>> On 06 Aug 2014, at 22:33, Alexander Burger <a...@software-lab.de> wrote:
>> 
>>> Hi Randall,
>>> 
>>>> I believe that modern Linux and FreeBSD implementations use 32 bit
>>>> ints for the pid_t.
>>> 
>>> Right.
>>> 
>>>> There will never be that many processes on a 32 bit
>>>> OS, but since they just go forward until they wrap, getting a pid bigger
>>>> than 16 bits is probably even to be expected.
>>> 
>>> However, they don't plainly wrap. There is a system limit in the kernel,
>>> controlled via "/proc/sys/kernel/pid_max".
>>> 
>>> Even on 64-bit machines (where pid_t is also an 'int', i.e. a 64-bit
>>> number), PIDs don't get up to such huge numbers.
>>> 
>>> ♪♫ Alex
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