Hi Christophe,

> Now I have another similar problem with numbers.
> First, I understand the reasons behind having fixpoint numbers
> ...
> : (scl 1)  # just for some examples to show
> -> 1
> : 1
> -> 1
> : 1.0
> -> 10
> : (* 1.0 1.0)
> -> 100
> : (+ 1 1.0)
> -> 11
> 
> It's is just impossible for a teacher to explain this to a newbie
> without being considered a fool. PicoLisp being cool nonetheless.

In fact, I would not try to explain it with these examples, but
work _only_ with scaled integers first. Should be no problem for
you as a math teacher.

And then explain that the dot is just a read macro, not part of
the language machinery per se.


> So I'm looking for workarounds. I thought about two.
> 
> The first is a plain Lisp solution, but I would need to hijack the
> READer to avoid 1 and 1.0 being different as soon as *Scl > 0.

The solution would be to extend the internal representation of numbers,
e.g. with an additional bit to distinguish between non-scaled and scaled
integers.

♪♫ Alex
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