Floating point numbers implicitly terminate in infinitely repeating
zeros after the 52 expressed bits of mantissa.

Or, put differently, when we need to represent numbers which have
non-zero bits that can't be represented, we approximate. Or, another
view of floating point numbers is that they each represent an infinity
of values which divide the number line between the preceding and
following values (with a few special cases, like the ininities).

I hope this helps in your efforts to express what you are looking for...

Thanks,

-- 
Raul
On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 3:23 PM Skip Cave <s...@caveconsulting.com> wrote:
>
> Ok. Then I redefine my question:
>
> Given the vector a:
>
> ]a =. % 1+i.20
>
> 1 0.5 0.333333 0.25 0.2 0.166667 0.142857 0.125 0.111111 0.1 0.0909091
> 0.0833333 0.0769231 0.0714286 0.0666667 0.0625 0.0588235 0.0555556
> 0.0526316 0.05
>
>
> Define a verb that will find all the floating-point numbers in a that will
> eventually terminate in infinitely repeating zeros.
>
>
> Skip
>
>
> On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 2:12 PM Henry Rich <henryhr...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > The trailing 0 repeats forever.
> >
> > Henry Rich
> >
> >
> >
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