You could do this with rational numbers, since whether or not they
terminate IS an interesting puzzle. Of course, you have to specify a
"decimal" base -- 1/3 doesn't terminate base 10, but does terminate base 60.

On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 12:26 PM Raul Miller <rauldmil...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Floating point numbers implicitly terminate in infinitely repeating
> zeros after the 52 expressed bits of mantissa.
>
> Or, put differently, when we need to represent numbers which have
> non-zero bits that can't be represented, we approximate. Or, another
> view of floating point numbers is that they each represent an infinity
> of values which divide the number line between the preceding and
> following values (with a few special cases, like the ininities).
>
> I hope this helps in your efforts to express what you are looking for...
>
> Thanks,
>
> --
> Raul
> On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 3:23 PM Skip Cave <s...@caveconsulting.com> wrote:
> >
> > Ok. Then I redefine my question:
> >
> > Given the vector a:
> >
> > ]a =. % 1+i.20
> >
> > 1 0.5 0.333333 0.25 0.2 0.166667 0.142857 0.125 0.111111 0.1 0.0909091
> > 0.0833333 0.0769231 0.0714286 0.0666667 0.0625 0.0588235 0.0555556
> > 0.0526316 0.05
> >
> >
> > Define a verb that will find all the floating-point numbers in a that
> will
> > eventually terminate in infinitely repeating zeros.
> >
> >
> > Skip
> >
> >
> > On Wed, Jun 13, 2018 at 2:12 PM Henry Rich <henryhr...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > The trailing 0 repeats forever.
> > >
> > > Henry Rich
> > >
> > >
> > >
> > ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
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