Alexandre Belgrand wrote on 1/29/19 8:13 AM:
Le mardi 29 janvier 2019 à 09:51 +0200, Ilpo Järvinen a écrit :
Yeah yeah, the only modification was that chip as claimed in the
article?
Magically all the necessary signal pins were routed to its location
but nothing else was changed (and you cannot have that many pins in
that sized chip anyway which will seriously limit the possible
functionality
and processing speed). ...But it must all be true and present in
thousands
of servers because a sensational article so claims (funny though that
the
so claimed victims of the attack consistently denied presence of such
a
chip in their servers but I guess you'll anyway think they must be
lying
for the benefit of the Chinese, damage control, because of the
"investigation", or whatever reason).


Good point. Obviously, this article has had access to classified
informations and is  part of a new "name and shame" policy. So can we
trust it?

No. That Bloomberg article is a good example of FUD. Simplest explanation is it's sown by someone looking to make a quick buck by shorting Supermicro stock. Slightly more paranoid is it's coming verbatim from Chinese intelligence services to introduce distrust into supply lines, similar to what CIA did with Russian pipelines decades ago. More paranoid is it's from domestic intelligence services seeking to increase their own obscene budgets by offering to protect us from these scary threats. In conclusion, it should be ignored until there is independent confirmation from multiple sources.

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