Re: [cayugabirds-l] Evening Grosbeak!

2021-05-03 Thread Tom Fernandes
Over here in McGraw, for the past three days there has been 4 Evening
Grosbeak and a couple of pine siskin joined today by FOY B. Oriole at my
feeders. I concur a nice spring selection of birds . Now bring on the
warblers. Tom Fernandes


On Mon, May 3, 2021, 6:58 AM Marie P. Read  wrote:

> A male Evening Grosbeak is currently sharing my backyard sunflower seed
> feeder with a Purple Finch. It’s lime green bill is stunning. A surprise in
> any year, but especially so in Spring.
>
> Marie
>
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[cayugabirds-l] Yellow Bellied Sapsucker Question

2021-02-22 Thread Tom Fernandes
There seems to be numerous reports of sapsuckers in CNY this winter. In my
thirty plus years living here I don't recall ever seeing one in the winter.
Here in McGraw I have one visiting my feeders for the past few weeks. How
common is it for them to winter in our area?

   Thanks, Tom Fernandes

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Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Knox-Marsellus Marsh Dike Walk Sun Sept 8th, 2019

2019-09-09 Thread Tom Fernandes
Dave Nicosia, Thank you so much for leading this past Sundays walk. For someone 
who mostly birds alone , it was a great learning experience and all the extra 
sets of eyes were quite helpful as well.Dave Nutter thanks so much for  the 
insight into Stilt Sandpiper feeding behavior it sure made locating them much 
easier!! The sedge wren imitator , yellow warbler I think you said ( or was it 
yellowthroat? Please correct me)was also very interesting. What a great 
experience birding with such a friendly, welcoming and extremely knowledgeable 
group.Thanks again  for a great time.   I highly recommend these walks for all 
levels of  birders!   Tom FernandesSent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy 
smartphone
 Original message From: Dave Nutter  Date: 
9/9/19  3:38 PM  (GMT-05:00) To: David Nicosia  Cc: 
Cayuga birds , "Van Beusichem, Andrea" 
, "Ziemba, Linda"  Subject: 
Re: [cayugabirds-l] Montezuma Knox-Marsellus Marsh Dike Walk Sun Sept 8th, 2019 
Thanks, Dave Nicosia, for doing a great job leading the walks, keeping eBird 
lists, and writing summaries! I have a few things to add. First, it made a big 
difference that the dike had been widely mowed for the Muckrace, so it was easy 
to view the impoundment. Not only could we watch from more places, but several 
people could stand next to each other without anyone’s view being blocked, and 
short people could just plain see, all of which had been difficult when the 
vegetation was tall everywhere along the dike. Thank-you, Refuge staff.Second, 
it was Ken & Adriaan who found the small passerine flock in the SE corner of 
the woods, including Magnolia Warbler, Common Yellowthroat, a Red-eyed Vireo 
which surprisingly made a couple of wide sweeping sallies out from the woods, 
Swamp Sparrow, Song Sparrow (all of which I saw), and Least Flycatcher (which I 
missed).Dave Nicosia listed a flyover Wilson’s Snipe, but from farther along 
the dike I managed to follow such a bird in my scope until it alit on the open 
mud, barely visible to me as I looked over an island of cattails. With several 
other folks, I walked on the dike past the cattails and proudly aimed my scope 
at the Snipe who was walking toward a sleeping Greater Yellowlegs and a 
preening Pectoral Sandpiper on either side of an inconsequential bit of weed 
stubble. The first person looking through my scope had a great view, but the 
second person couldn’t find the Snipe. I looked again, and neither could I. 
Then someone looking through another scope saw the Snipe’s head move in the 
weed stubble, and people again took turns watching. When I got my scope back, I 
watched the Snipe for awhile, too. Eventually I realized that I really could 
see most of the Snipe, but it matched the weed stubble in height, color, and 
pattern. This was a life bird for one of the people with me. Early in the walk 
I had fallen behind Dave Nicosia, and I saw 3 American Golden-Plovers flying 
back and forth over the marsh. They started low, but gradually gained altitude 
and eventually appeared to fly off toward the Wildlife Drive. At least 2 of 
them were adults in transition to winter plumage but still with considerable 
blotches of black below. Much later I found a single such bird walking on the 
mud, so I told people about it, and when I looked again, there were 3 plovers. 
Maybe they were the same birds that I saw depart a couple hours earlier, having 
determined that Knox-Marsellus had the best shorebird habitat around. Again 
people were interested in the subtleties of Stilt Sandpiper ID, so we worked on 
that while watching their distinctive vertical ramming feeding behavior among 
the more randomly pecking Greater & Lesser Yellowlegs. And I talked about 
Pectoral Sandpipers, whose color & pattern are similar to Least, but whose 
shape differs, the larger species having a proportionately smaller head with an 
actual neck showing at times (Least & Semipalmated Sandpipers look neck-less to 
me). And I talked about how to use color and shape and proportions in shorebird 
ID generally.On our way out onto the dikes we saw several Long-billed 
Dowitchers, whose immaculate juvenile plumage had a cold grayish-tan hue 
overall and whose tertials were plain gray with narrow pale edges. When I was 
leaving, walking slow and falling behind everyone else, I discovered a juvenile 
Short-billed Dowitcher which must have just arrived. It had a warm overall 
orange glow in the sunlight from the edging on all the back & wing feathers, 
including the tertials, which had additional orange bars. I wished there were 
still people with me to show it to.                                             
                                                                                
                                                                                
                                                                                
                                                                                
      

Re: [cayugabirds-l] Not birds-but FIREFLIES tonight

2014-06-29 Thread Tom Fernandes
Think it is a good year for fireflies!.  Jerseybirds had a post of a great 
display last week down in NJ. I also had one of the best displays in years in 
my yard in McGraw.

Tom Fernandes
 McGraw.NY
From: Linda Orkin 
Sent: Sunday, June 29, 2014 2:28 AM
To: Mike Pitzrick 
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS- L 
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Not birds-but FIREFLIES tonight

Thanks Mike and Dave. Mike, that chart is very illuminating. I had no idea 
there were that many species. Amber seems a good way to describe what I saw as 
red.  It seems a monumental brain task to sort out all the flashing going on 
but just having these different parameters in mind would help you to see 
better. 

Linda

Sent from my iPhone

On Jun 29, 2014, at 12:23 AM, Mike Pitzrick mpitzr...@gmail.com wrote:


  Hi Linda,


  In order for a Doppler shift to noticeably change the color of light that 
much, the firefly would have to be traveling thousands of miles an hour!  It 
may be that what you are seeing are multiple species of firefly.  


  The Museum of Science in Boston has published some web pages with information 
about how to identify fireflies using their flash color and pattern.

  Types Of Fireflies


  Flash Chart


  Virtual Habitat (interactive tool to help you learn to identify firefly 
flashes)



  These web pages are part of a citizen science project called Firefly Watch, 
which is designed to find out more about the distribution of the various 
firefly species.

  -Mike 



  On Sat, Jun 28, 2014 at 10:49 PM, Linda Orkin wingmagi...@gmail.com wrote:

Does anyone else notice that some of the flashes look like different 
colors. Reds and greens. Is this just like a Doppler shift type thing or are 
they really like that?

Linda



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