Summer weather and COVID-19

2020-05-22 Thread John Clark
A new study from Harvard indicates that warmer weather and more humidity
and UV exposure will only modestly slow down the spread of the virus. It
all depends on the R value, the average number of people a infected person
will pass on the disease to others, if it's less than 1 the virus will
eventually die out. In Wuhan in the very early days of the epidemic before
any social distancing took effect R was found to be about 3.5. And this new
study suggests that the summer weather will likely reduce R by 43%,  and
that means R would still be way larger than 1. So that does not bode well
for the recent rash of reopenings that have been urged by some politicians,
by late summer or early fall we should know if this grim prediction was
correct.

Warmer weather alone will NOT be enough to fully contain the transmission
of COVID-19


John K Clark

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Virus Testing

2020-05-21 Thread John Clark
The news just broke that in a boneheaded move the US Center for Disease
Control has been combining the results from the virus test with the results
of the antibody test in its statistics without telling anybody, and that
makes the results almost impossible to interpret. The virus test is the
gold standard and tells you if you have the virus right now; if you're sick
but the test is negative then something other than COVID-19 is making you
ill. The less accurate antibody test tells you if you've ever been exposed
to the virus and a positive result may mean you are immune from the virus.
One test looks ahead the other looks behind.

The virus test is only administered to those who already have symptoms of
COVID-19, but the antibody test is being given to the general population at
random and has a much higher false negative result than the virus test, so
combining those results will very strongly drive down the positive rate
statistics. And states have been using these very questionable statistics
to decide when it is safe to reopen!

How Could the CDC Make That Mistake?


Meanwhile a disease computer model says that if the lockdown had started
just one week earlier in March at least 36,000 American lives could have
been saved.

Delay
in Lockdown Led to at Least 36,000 More Deaths, Models Find


John K Clark

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Making a GOOGOL:1 Reduction with Lego Gears

2020-05-17 Thread John Clark
Making a GOOGOL:1 Reduction with Lego Gears


John K Clark

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Vaccines

2020-05-13 Thread John Clark
The average vaccine takes 10.7 years to go from an idea to something the
average person can get, the fastest one was the Ebola vaccine and it took 5
years. That's way too slow. It takes such a long time because before
clinical trials start an experimental vaccine only has a 6% chance of ever
reaching the market; even if it gets to the clinical trials stage there is
only a 33% chance of success. But a COVID-19 vaccine is so important we
can't proceed with doing business the usual way, we need a massive
Manhattan Project style effort. About 100 different vaccines are some stage
of development and at least half of them should be aggressively pursued in
parallel. And we should definitely use human challenge trials, some will
say that's immoral but I think the moral path is the one that produces the
least sickness and death.

There is also the problem of scaling up, even after a good Vaccine is found
we need to make enough for 7.6 billion people. Bill Gates has picked 7
vaccines that he thinks are most promising and is spending several billion
dollars to make 7 factories to mass produce them with the full knowledge
that most of the factories will be unused and most of the money will end up
being wasted because he is willing to trade money for time because every
day you save in finding a vaccine you save thousands of lives.  But it's
not enough, we need at least 50 factories, if 49 are never used that's OK,
it would be money well spent as far as I'm concerned.

John K Clark

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Re: Human Challenge Trials

2020-05-12 Thread John Clark
On Tue, May 12, 2020 at 9:29 AM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> t'Rump has a hard time making words such as "and" and "the" truthful.
>

For Trump lying comes as naturally as breathing, if he said "hello" to me I
wouldn't believe him.


> > In China, S, Korea and Germany the pandemic is already rebounding as
> they have opened up.
>

South Korea reported its first case OF COVID-19 on January 20, the exact
same day the US did, but unlike the US within 2 days they had developed
their own test for the virus and started a massive program of testing. So
as of today only 10,936 people in South Korea have gotten sick from the
virus and 258 have died, but in the US 1,387,496 have gotten sick from the
virus and 81,937 have died from it. And in the first quarter the GDP of
South Korea declined by 1.4%, in the USA it declined by 4.8%. And today the
unemployment rate in the US is 14.7%, in South Korea It's 3.8%.

> we have a clown for a President
>

I think you're being a little unfair to clowns, they make you want to
laugh, this jackass makes you want to cry.

John K Clark

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Re: General Relativity and Noether's theorem

2020-05-10 Thread John Clark
On Sun, May 10, 2020 at 10:46 AM Alan Grayson 
wrote:

 > *Haven't you heard? Energy has mass equivalence, so one can ask how the
> energy/mass "vanished". AG*
>

And the answer you imbecile is that on the cosmological scale energy/mass
is *NOT* conserved, so just like everything else that is *NOT* conserved
just vanishing is just fine. And if you don't like that answer it's because
the question "where does something that is not conserved go?" is as dumb as
dogshit.

John K Clark

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Re: General Relativity and Noether's theorem

2020-05-10 Thread John Clark
On Sun, May 10, 2020 at 10:30 AM Alan Grayson 
wrote:

> *All our experience indicates that energy is conserved,*


Your knowledge is 91 years out of date, all our experience does *NOT*
indicate energy is conserved. Edwin Hubble discovered the cosmological
redshift in 1929.

John K Clark

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Re: General Relativity and Noether's theorem

2020-05-10 Thread John Clark
On Sun, May 10, 2020 at 7:42 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

> Of course, if I ask the question, it implies conservation of energy.


Then why do you imply conservation of energy when we specifically said
energy is not conserved? Nobody thinks Entropy is conserved so it would be
silly to ask where it came from, and the same would be true for energy if
it is also not conserved. The second law of thermodynamics can be derived
by logic alone but the first law can not be, conserved energy is not more
logical or more mathematical than non-conservation, the only reason we ever
thought energy was conserved was that it seemed to be conserved in most of
our experiments, but now we have seen a few examples, such as the
cosmological redshift, where energy is not conserved. When new information
is found our thinking must change, that's science.

* > do you plan to deal with my question related to the UP, *


I saw no question related to the UP, I just saw a string of unrelated words
with a question mark at the end.

John K Clark

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Re: General Relativity and Noether's theorem

2020-05-10 Thread John Clark
On Sat, May 9, 2020 at 10:31 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:


> *> Now, assuming energy is not conserved, it's still a reasonable question
> about where the lost energy goes,*
>

No, that is NOT a reasonable question, that is not even close to being a
reasonable question! If the lost energy actually went somewhere then the
energy has been conserved because that's what "conserved" means. And if the
lost energy went nowhere then the energy has not been conserved because
that's what "not conserved" means.

John K Clark



>

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General Relativity and Noether's theorem

2020-05-09 Thread John Clark
On Sat, May 9, 2020 at 7:49 AM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> since GR is a local principle, based on local translations of vectors
> etc, there is then no general symmetry rule for energy conservation.


General Relativity and Noether's theorem were both found in 1916, and so
physicists knew that there was not a law of conservation of energy, so they
must have known the distant past and distant future must be very different
from how things are now. So why didn't they know in 1916 that something
like the Big Bang must be true and something like the Steady State Theory
must be wrong? But the Steady State Theory didn't die till the 1960's.

John K Clark

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Re: Total energy of the universe

2020-05-09 Thread John Clark
On Fri, May 8, 2020 at 7:33 AM Bruce Kellett  wrote:


> *>> If you believe in what's called "evidence", and extrapolating from it
>> to create a hypothetical physical theory, can you give a single example of
>> something coming from nothing? AG *
>>
>
> *> Two examples. The universe; Dark energy.*
>

Alan Grayson kindly provides us with another example, words, they are not
conserved, no matter how many he expells he never runs out of words and
most of them pop into existence for no reason whatsoever.

John K Clark

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Human Challenge Trials

2020-05-08 Thread John Clark
If you want to do something drastic to end this virus nightmare there is
something we could do that would be far more effective than waiting for
herd immunity as well as being less ethically questionable, although I'm
sure some would still clutch their pearls in horror, I'm referring to Human
Challenge Trials. The idea is young healthy volunteers would be injected
with a experimental vaccine (or a placebo) and then deliberately infected
with the COVID-19 virus. This would dramatically speed up vaccine
development and save many thousands, perhaps millions, of lives; not to
mention stop the economy from collapsing into rubble. The death rate for
young healthy people who get COVID-19 is only about 1.4 deaths per 10,000
and the death rate for those who volunteer as kidney donors is 3 times
that, we accept one as being ethical why not the other?
As one ethicist put it:


*"This is the trolley problem where the fat man wants to jump knowing his
chance of death is below 1% and our decision is whether to stop him."*
Should volunteers to be infected with coronavirus to test vaccines?


Human Challenge Trials—A Coronavirus Taboo


John K Clark

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Re: What does "physical" mean?

2020-05-04 Thread John Clark
Galen Strawson

>*What does the word ‘physical’ mean in its most general theoretical
> philosophical use? It’s used in many different ways, and it’s hard to
> imagine that philosophers could reach agreement on a best use. *
>

Yes, and that's why unlike physicists and mathematicians philosophers
haven't discovered anything new in a thousand years, they can't even
agree on what questions to ask much less find the answers.


> *> Should we tie the meaning of ‘physical’ closely to physics?*
>

Obviously physics is the study of the physical so the answer is yes.


> To do so (in a non-circular way)
>
All definitions of "physical" or of anything else becomes circular if you
go far enough, that's why language needs examples to give words meaning, so
physics is what physicists study.

> *is to run the risk of ruling out the possibility that there might be two
> different universes that were ‘formally’ or structurally identical or
> homomorphic although substantially different—made of different stuff.*
>
I don't know what identical but substantially different means but another
good definition of physical is one of Richard Feynman's favorite words,
"stuff".

John K Clark

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Re: The Wolfram Model

2020-05-02 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 3:43 PM Philip Thrift  wrote:

> *You will be introduced to the true formulation of the foundations of
> physics -  which will lead to its unification - leaving behind the deluding
> morass of the old mathematical-physics foundations you were brainwashed
> with as a student.*
>

Will this true formulation of the foundation of physics allow somebody to
solve a high school physics problem as well as the brainwashed version can,
for example what will happen when you roll a ball down a inclined plane?
Before Wolfram's model can explain Quarks and Gluons and find the theory of
everything it first has to tackle classical Physics 101. And it's one hell
of a long way from being able to do that. So at least for the time being
I'm sticking with brainwashing.

John K Clark

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Re: The orbit of two black holes timed by the passage thru accretion disk

2020-05-02 Thread John Clark
On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 8:08 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> This is quite interesting.
>
> https://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2020-080
>

Yes, that is interesting. I was surprised the orbit of the smaller Black
Hole was so oblong, I would have thought the Gravitational Waves given off
by it would have circularized the orbit, but maybe there hasn't been enough
time.

 John K Clark

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-05-01 Thread John Clark
On Fri, May 1, 2020 at 8:00 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

> *Firstly, concerning the postulates of QM and the UP,*
>

Mathematics has postulates. Science doesn't. The nearest equivalent for
Science is experimental results. So it doesn't matter where you originally
got an idea, if the idea allows you to make better predictions than anybody
else (astronomically better in the case of virtual particles) then
scientists will take your idea very very seriously indeed.

*> There's an axiomatic approach to QM*
>

No there is not, like every other branch of science there is only an
experimental
approach.


> > *which does NOT include the UP. This is what's presented in texts on
> QM. Those postulates include, for example, the operators for position and
> momentum, and so forth. The UP is definitely NOT one of these postulates,
> and the UP can be derived from them. It's done in any decent course in QM.
> Do you agree or not? AG*
>

I neither agree nor disagree because I don't know what the hell you're
talking about.  All I know is if Virtual Particles or the Uncertainty
Principle or even Quantum Mechanics itself couldn't make predictions that
could be confirmed experimentally no scientist would pay them any
attention. And the Virtual Particle idea can make better predictions than
anything else in all of Science. Full stop.

* > your virtual particles are just terms in a perturbation expansion which
> helps in a calculation. This doesn't mean they actually exist in violation
> of energy conservation. *
>

Hmmm...I wonder if that's why they're called VIRTUAL particles and not just
particles.

 John K Clark

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-05-01 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Apr 29, 2020 at 8:18 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> What I want to know is your justification for your prior statement about
> virtual particles and borrowing of energy. You can't just pull it out of a
> hat as call it Gospel. *


I sure as hell *can* pull it out of a hat if it has been EXPERIMENTALLY
CONFIRMED TO A HIGHER DEGREE OF PRECISION than any other idea in, not just
physics, but in all of Science! And if that offends your Gospel or your
delicate physical "postulates" (whatever the hell that's suposed to mean)
then it's time for you to find a new Gospel.

> *t**here must have some justification. *


There is. It works.

 John K Clark

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Beautiful Avatar like glowing plants are now real

2020-04-29 Thread John Clark
People have made glowing plants before but they only glowed dimly and for a
short amount of time, but for the first time scientists have used genetic
engineering to make a plant that glowed permanently, from the day it
sprouted from a seed to the day it died, and it's 10 times brighter than
any previous plant so it's easily visible to the naked eye.

Plants with genetically encoded autoluminescence


There already plans to commercialize and offer a range of glowing
houseplants, I think they would sell because they really are beautiful,
they'd be even better when they have more colors than just green.

Timelapse video of incredible glowing plants growing


John K Clark

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Re: How math is ruining physics

2020-04-29 Thread John Clark
Most physicists are not working at the most fundamental level of reality,
they're a solid state physicist or a thermodynamicist or an astrophysicist,
but if you are working at that level then you have no choice but to go
deeper and deeper into very abstract mathematics. Everybody would prefer it
if there were lots of new experimental results to work with that would give
hints on which way to go, but there just isn't any. Most thought the LHC
would find lots of interesting stuff besides the Higgs, they thought
supersymmetric particles would be easier to find than the Higgs, but there
is no hint of them or of anything else that is new. Lots of big expensive
experiments were set up to detect Dark Matter but they all came up
negative; we don't know anything more about what Dark Matter is than we did
20 years ago, the same is true of Dark Energy. You've got to work with what
you're given and all we've got right now is math. I mean, ... it's not as
if physicists had a choice.

 John K Clark

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Re: A preferred direction to the universe?

2020-04-29 Thread John Clark
On Tue, Apr 28, 2020 at 8:42 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Well, having read the article this is a result I hope disappears in the
> light of further work. This would almost mean the universe has no rhyme or
> reason at all.
>

Before 1900 the shape of the blackbody radiation curve made no sense at
all, but it led to things that nobody at the time could have dreamed of,
maybe something similar will happen this time.

John K Clark

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COVID-19 has killed more Americans than the Vietnam War

2020-04-28 Thread John Clark
It took the Vietnam War 12 years to kill 47,424 Americans in combat, 58,209
if you include non combat deaths. As of today April 28 at 19:52 GMT
COVID-19 has killed 58,269 Americans and it did it in less than 2 months.
The US only has 4% of the world's population but, even though it is a rich
technologically advanced country and had a month more time to prepare for
the virus than other nations, it has 33% of the world's COVID-19 cases.
There is a reason the US squandered those advantages, and if you're honest
with yourself you know what that reason is. That reason thinks Clorox
injections and sticking a UV flashlight up your ass can cure disease, and
that's why I'm not a big fan of enablers of that reason, like Julian
Assange for example.

By the way, the official death numbers I gave above are almost certainly
way too low. The Yale School of Public Health found that between March 1
and April 4 15,000 more Americans died than what you'd expect
statistically, but only 8,000 officially had the word "COVID-19" on the
death certificate, and the discrepancy was largest in places that were hit
the hardest with COVID-19.

Estimating the early death toll of COVID-19 in the United States


John K Clark
ReplyForward

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A preferred direction to the universe?

2020-04-28 Thread John Clark
The universe may have a preferred direction. A new study has found a
spatial variation in the Fine Structure Constant (a pure number
approximately equal to 1/137) with a 3.9 sigma level of confidence, that
means there is a 0.8% chance it's just a statistical fluke. It's not good
enough to claim a discovery, that requires 5 sigma or only 0.023% chance of
it being bogus, but it's good enough to be interesting. The detected
variation has a dipole structure, the laws of physics that govern
electromagnetism seem to get stronger in one direction, and the further we
look the stronger it gets, and it gets weaker when we look in the oposite
direction, with no change in the perpendicular direction. In other words it
has a dipole shape.

If this turns out to be true then Noether's theorem tells us that the Law
Of conservation Of Angular Momentum is only approximately true.

Four direct measurements of the fine-structure constant 13 billion years ago


This new optical work is consistent with a different study from a few weeks
ago that used  X rays instead of optical light, they also found a variation
and along the same axis.

Rethinking cosmology: Universe expansion may not be uniform


John K Clark

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A Potential COVID-19 Vaccine

2020-04-27 Thread John Clark
A lab in Briton has used genetic engineering to jump ahead of everybody
else and has developed a COVID-19 vaccine in record time. It seems safe in
humans and has been shown to work with rhesus macaque monkeys. Six of the
animals were given one shot of the vaccine and then exposed to very high
levels of COVID-19. Animals that didn't get the vaccine consistently got
sick, but after 28 days all 6 vaccinated monkeys remained healthy. Last
week a Phase 1 clinical trial involving 1,100 humans started and next month
a combined Phase 2 and Phase 3 trial involving 6,000 people will start, it
will be the first time any COVID-19 vaccine is tested for effectiveness and
not just safety. If it works in humans as well as it does in monkeys (a big
IF) we could manufacture several million doses of the vaccine by September,
much earlier than previously thought.

Keep your fingers crossed, I don't believe that superstition helps but they
say it works even if you don't believe it.

In Race for a Coronavirus Vaccine, an Oxford Group Leaps Ahead


John K Clark.

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-04-27 Thread John Clark
On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 5:18 PM 'Brent Meeker' via Everything List <
everything-list@googlegroups.com> wrote:

*> I think you are to readily reifying the mathematics.  Virtual particles
> are just Feynman's invention to keep track of consistent expansions of the
> Green's function.  There are other mathematical techniques for calculating
> the same number. *


But they all involve violating the law of conservation of energy for short
amounts of time, and the shorter the time the larger the violation.

John K Clark

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-04-26 Thread John Clark
On Sun, Apr 26, 2020 at 12:24 PM Alan Grayson 
wrote:

*> As I understand the UP, it's a statistical statement *


No. It says the more exactly you specify the position of a particle the
less exactly you can specify the velocity of the particle; or stated in a
alternativ form, the shorter the time duration the more energy a particle
(or even empty space) can have without detecting any violation of the law
of conservation of energy.

*> The UP follows from the postulates of QM. So if one assume these
> postulates, there is indeed a proof of the UP.*


I repeat, this is physics not mathematics, if an experiment violates
somebody's postulates then that's just too bad for the postulates because
experiment and observation is the ultimate authority in science. And, given
that it can make predictions to 12 significant digits, experiment and
observation tells us that virtual particles exist as unequivocally as
science can tell us anything.

 John K Clark

>
>

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-04-26 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Apr 25, 2020 at 12:49 PM Alan Grayson 
wrote:

*> How does QM tell us that conservation of energy can be violated for
> brief durations? If you apply the time-energy form of the UP for your
> proof, please state the context of your proof, that is, exactly what do E
> and t stand for.*


The shorter the time (t) a system is under observation the larger the
amount of energy (E) could pop into existence from nothing without direct
detection, enough energy to create virtual particles. And you can calculate
how large the indirect effects these virtual particles would have on the
system.

> in your proof.


This is physics not mathematic so there is no proof. However if you take
the above as a working assumption and you use it to calculate the magnetic
moment of an electron you get a value of 0.001,159,652,181. When you make
no assumptions or theoretical calculations at all and just determine the
value experimentally you get a value of 0.001,159,652,182. And you just
don't get agreement between theory and experiment that is much better than
that in science. So I'd say it's a pretty damn good assumption!

John K Clark

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-04-23 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Apr 22, 2020 at 12:19 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> If the two Casimir plates are grounded there will be no electrostatic
> potential between them.  Elementary electricity.
>

Yes, and even if the plates were electrically charged they'd have the same
charge, so they'd repel each other, but the Casimir effect attracts so if
anything electrostatics would tend to cause an experimenter to
underestimate the strength of the casimir effect not produce it.

John K Clark

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-04-22 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Apr 22, 2020 at 1:39 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

> Could it be the case that Casimir plates attract each other due to
> electrostatic forces and not vacuum energy?


Of course not! Don't you thing getting rid of electrostatic forces would be
the very first thing any even halfway competent experimental scientists
would think of before he even dreamed of performing such a super delicate
experiment?

 John K Clark

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Re: Vacuum energy

2020-04-21 Thread John Clark
On Tue, Apr 21, 2020 at 4:42 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> how can the EM field contribute anything to the vacuum energy in a
> region of empty space far away from charged particles? *


Because Quantum Mechanics tells us that some things can happen for no
reason, and because it tells us that the law of conservation of energy can
be violated, if only for a very short amount of time. So 2 particles with
opposite charges can briefly pop into existence, and so can electromagnetic
waves. And we know what Quantum Mechanics is telling us is true because it
has been experimentally verified to very high precision.

John K Clark

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John Conway is dead

2020-04-20 Thread John Clark
John Conway, the inventor of the Game Of Life and one of the greatest
mathematicians in the world has died of COVID-19.

John Conway Solved Mathematical Problems With His Bare Hands


John K Clark

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Re: Crash course on the Fall of Rome

2020-04-20 Thread John Clark
On Sun, Apr 19, 2020 at 5:59 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> I believe the Roman army was well paid, had a prestigious status in
> society, and had superior tactics in battle, using superior weapons, and
> perhaps most important was able to fight as a unit. But as Rome expanded it
> didn't do a great job in assimilating "the barbarians". Over time they
> became incorporated in the Roman army, acquired its weapons, and perhaps
> most important learned its tactical methods for fighting as a unit. Thus,
> over time, the Roman army lost its advantage, which led to the demise of
> the Empire. How correct is my thesis?*
>

Maybe, but it's not obvious that a barbarian born man couldn't learn Roman
battle tactics as well as a Roman born man. So maybe after a century or so
of relative peace they lost experience and were no longer battle hardened.
Or maybe the Romans didn't get weaker at all and instead the barbarians
just got stronger. Or maybe the answer is not even in sociology but in
chemistry.

The Romans used lead piping extensively for their drinking water and baths,
and they used a salt of lead, Lead acetate (Pb(CH3COO)2), to sweeten their
wine. Because it was rather expensive only the elite used Sugar Of Lead as
it was called, and it's not good for a society if your leadership suffers
from lead poisoning because it tends to make people stupid and sluggish.

John K Clark

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Re: Question on spin

2020-04-18 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Apr 18, 2020 at 2:56 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> What's the difference in behavior when a beam of spin 1 particles passes
> through a SG device, compared to spin 1/2 particles? TIA, AG*
>

A Stern–Gerlach device uses magnets to seperate out fermions like electrons
into beams of spin +1/2 and spin -1/2 particles, a SG device won't work for
a beam of boson such as photons. To do something comparable and separate
spin +1 photons from spin -1 photons you'd use a polarizing filter not a
magnet.

 John K Clark






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Quantum Computers

2020-04-16 Thread John Clark
In today's issue of the journal Nature there is a article about a Silicon
based Quantum Computer that operates at temperatures as high as 1.25
degrees Kelvin with an error rate of only 0.7%. That may seem pretty cold
but previous Silicon based Quantum Computers, the type corporate investors
like best, needed 0.01 degrees Kelvin. Compared with that 1.25 is
blistering hot.

Universal quantum logic in hot silicon qubits


John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-16 Thread John Clark
On Thu, Apr 16, 2020 at 3:51 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:


> *>It surely does have a basis in experience. We've never seen any process
> that can occur in zero time duration! AG *
>

Therefore one should be extremely cautious about confidently asserting what
can and can not happen during zero time duration, such as finite stuff can
but infinite stuff can't.

John K Clark

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Why is there more matter than antimatter?

2020-04-15 Thread John Clark
Why is there more matter than antimatter when the properties of the 2
things seem symmetrical? Back in 1964 a particle called the "kaon" was
discover that showed the symmetry between the two was not quite perfect and
slightly favored matter over antimatter, but kaons are rare and that effect
was much too slight to explain why the Big Bang didn't annihilate nearly
all the matter in the universe. But now in today's issue of the journal
Nature indications of a far larger discrepancy was found between neutrinos
and antineutrinos, and matter is winning. More muon neutrinos are
oscillating into electron neutrinos than muon antineutrinos are oscillating
into electron antineutrinos. The evadens is only 3 sigma so there is still
one chance in a thousand it's just a statistical fluke and 5 sigma (one in
a million) is required to officially claim a discovery but it's still a
pretty big deal.

Constraint on the matter–antimatter symmetry-violating phase in neutrino
oscillations 

John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-15 Thread John Clark
On Tue, Apr 14, 2020 at 4:27 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> If you solve Schroedinger's equation for the wf, you get a solution for
> all space and time. If it's physical, or shall we say ontological, how can
> it propagate infinitely? *


If it started out infinite the universe wouldn't have to propagate at all
to be infinite. And finite or infinite it makes no difference,
Schrodinger's equation
breaks down at Big Bang time zero and so does every other known equation.
That situation won't change until somebody finds a quantum theory for
gravity.

 John K Clark

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Maybe things are getting better in the US

2020-04-14 Thread John Clark
On Tue, Apr 14, 2020 at 5:05 PM  wrote:

*> Meanwhile, what's the hold-up with quantum computing?*


Quantum decoherence. That's why I think anyons are so exciting.

Fractional statistics in anyon collisions


John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-14 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 5:11 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*>>> if you accept the measured age, it can't be finite or infinite in
>>> spatial extent when it began*
>>
>>
>> >> If something isn't finite or infinite what is the third alternative?
>>
>
> > *It doesn't exist;*
>

OK, but then what is "it"?

> *that is, your hypothesis that that when the universe began it was
> already infinite, or possibly finite, is false.*
>

So I ask again, if the universe isn't finite and it isn't infinite what is
your third alternative? And why would creating a finite amount of something
from nothing be easier than creating a infinite amount of something from
nothing? In my previous post I gave reasons for thinking the infinite case
might actually be simpler. And if creation was not involved because a
finite universe always existed then why couldn't a infinite universe just
as easily always have existed too?

  John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-13 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 2:07 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> if you accept the measured age, it can't be finite or infinite in
> spatial extent when it began*


If something isn't finite or infinite what is the third alternative?

 John K Clark


>

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-13 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 10:09 AM Alan Grayson 
wrote:

> My assumption is that it takes finite time to create anything, finite or
> infinite.


If your assumption is correct then knowing that the universe is 13.8
billion years old is no help at all in determining if it is spatially finite
or infinite.

John K Clark

>
>

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-13 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 8:52 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> if it had already been spatially infinite, how long had that situation
> been the case?  AG*


Another answer to your question is it would be exactly the same amount of
time if it had been the case that the universe had *already* been finite.

 John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-13 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 8:52 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

 >*If it had already been spatially infinite, how long had that situation
> been the case? *
>

There is uncertainty, perhaps for 5.39*10^-44 seconds or perhaps less.
Nobody knows for sure if time is quantized because we don't have a quantum
theory that incorporates General Relativity and gravity.

John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-13 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Apr 13, 2020 at 4:37 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

> *You're imagining a "start" of our universe with it being infinite in
> spatial extent.*


It's a possibility.

 > *So, in zero time duration, at its "creation", it expanded infinitely *


No, I'm saying at zero time the universe may have already been spatially
infinite, there is nothing we know of that would rule out the possibility.
It is not obvious that creating an infinity of something from nothing is
harder than creating a finite amount of something from nothing, in fact it
might even be easier because if it's infinite then you don't have to worry
about setting bounds. For example, calculating the magnetic field that
surrounds a infinitely long current carrying wire is far easier than
calculating the magnetic field that surrounds a wire that is only of finite
length. And people have found an exact solution in General Relativity that
tells you what would happen to spacetime around a very dense infinitely
long rod spinning at close to the speed of light (you get a closed timelike
curve, aka a time machine) but when you try to do the same thing for a rod
of only finite length the mathematics gets so complicated nobody can figure
out what the hell would happen, at least so far.

 John K Clark

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Maybe things are getting better in the US

2020-04-13 Thread John Clark
For the last 3 days the number of new COVID-19 deaths in the US has
declined, from 33,752 to 27,421, and the number of deaths from it has
declined from 2035 to 1528. Let's hope it's part of a long term trend and
not just a blip.

John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-12 Thread John Clark
On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 5:49 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*>>> As the universe expands, galaxies move progressively faster away from
>>> us as described by Hubble's constant, which is a geometric effect as
>>> previously explained, and eventually wink out. Conversely, if we play the
>>> movie backward in time, all those galaxies which previously winked out,
>>> should come into view.*
>>>
>>
>> >> Not if the universe started out as being infinite they don't.
>>
>
> *> Then our interpretation of Hubble's constant is wrong. AG *
>

Nope, the Hubble constant has nothing to do with it. And by the way, with
the discovery of Dark Energy we now know that the Hubble "constant" is not
constant.

*> it's all expanding and that's why galaxies wink out. If you play the
> movie backward to the BB, they should all come in view, which contradicts
> infinite in spatial extent. AG *
>

No! If the universe started out being infinite then if you play the movie
backwards everything won't come back into view because everything was NEVER
in view. So for all we know the universe could be spatially flat or
positively curved or negatively curved.

John K Clark






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>>  John K Clark
>>
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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-12 Thread John Clark
On Sun, Apr 12, 2020 at 4:33 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> As the universe expands, galaxies move progressively faster away from us
> as described by Hubble's constant, which is a geometric effect as
> previously explained, and eventually wink out. Conversely, if we play the
> movie backward in time, all those galaxies which previously winked out,
> should come into view.*
>

Not if the universe started out as being infinite they don't.


> *> your hypothesis makes no geometric sense. Mustn't we assume that if our
> universe is expanding,*
>

We don't need to assume anything, we have plenty of observational
evidence that the universe is expanding.

*> the expansion applies to the UN-observable region?*
>

It applies to all of the universe, it's all expanding and observability has
nothing to do with it.

 John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-04-12 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Apr 11, 2020 at 3:27 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> Hyperbolic can be ruled out for the same reason flat can be ruled out.
> Both are infinite in spatial extent, and since the universe has a finite
> age and expanding at less than an infinite rate throughout its lifetime
> (although the rate can be changing in different epochs and possibly faster
> than light speed in some epochs such as inflation), it cannot be infinite
> in spatial extent. I've made this argument several times, which is clear
> and straightforward, but never got anyone to agree. I find that baffling. *


That's because the universe could have been infinitely large from the very
first instant of its existence even before inflation started, I'm not
saying that it did I'm just saying there is no evidence that rules out that
possibility. And if it did start out that way then now the universe's
spatial curvature could be absolutely flat or even hyperbolic. And before
the discovery of Dark Energy people said that if the universe was
spherically curved then it couldn't expand forever, but with a new force
entering the equation that is no longer true. We now know it takes more
than just knowledge of the geometry of space to know the universe's
ultimate fate.

 John K Clark

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Re: Reductionism?

2020-04-12 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Apr 11, 2020 at 5:42 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:


> >> Although they have confirmed many theoretical predictions, particle
>> accelerators haven't discovered anything surprising since 1962 when it was
>> found that Muon Neutrinos were not the same as Electron Neutrinos, but
>> telescopes have provided plenty of fundamental physical surprises in recent
>> years; for example, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Dark Matter, Dark Energy
>> and the acceleration of the universe, Neutrino Oscillation and the
>> resulting mass they must have, the predominance of matter over antimatter,
>> and Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays which I don't think can be explained
>> without fundamental new physics of some sort.
>> John K Clark
>>
>
> > Tons of stuff has been found by particle accelerators since 1962. The
> whole QCD system of quarks and gluons was worked out from the mid-60s to
> the late 70s based on hadron scattering.
>

I'm not saying particle accelerators were not useful just that they didn't
discover anything surprising, in this case they just confirmed what Murray
Gell-Mann had already predicted.

> Then of course with the tevatron, LEP and then LHC the standard model was
> worked out.
>

And in this case accelerators confirmed what Glashow, Salam, and Weinberg
predicted. But no theoretician predicted Dark Matter or Dark Energy and the
acceleration of the universe, and they still can't figure those things out.
Those surprising discoveries needed telescopes not particle colliders.

 John K Clark

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Quantum Computers and Anyons

2020-04-11 Thread John Clark
In the April 10 2020 issue of the Journal Science the best evidence yet for
the existence of a quasiparticle called a "Anyon" is presented. Anyon's are
important because when 2 Anyon's loop around each other their quantum state
is altered and so that brading can be used to encode information. Such
brading would be far less susceptible to quantum decoherence than
other ways of encoding information, and decoherence is the only reason we
don't have practical and scalable Quantum Computers right now.

Fractional statistics in anyon collisions


John K Clark

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Re: Reductionism?

2020-04-11 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Apr 10, 2020 at 5:27 AM Philip Thrift  wrote:

*> the next time a particle physicist tries to tell you that we need higher
> energies to probe shorter distances because that’s where progress will come
> from, remind them that methodological reductionism is not the same as
> theory reductionism.*
>

Reductionism is always true but it may not always be relevant, a deep
understanding of String Theory will not make you a better meteorologist.
And higher energies will probe to shorter distances but that is enormously
expensive and there is another way to discover nature's fundamental
secrets, for example by probing astronomically large distances. Although
they have confirmed many theoretical predictions, particle accelerators
haven't discovered anything surprising since 1962 when it was found that
Muon Neutrinos were not the same as Electron Neutrinos, but telescopes have
provided plenty of fundamental physical surprises in recent years; for
example, Neutron Stars, Black Holes, Dark Matter, Dark Energy and the
acceleration of the universe, Neutrino Oscillation and the resulting mass
they must have, the predominance of matter over antimatter, and
Ultra-high-energy cosmic rays which I don't think can be explained without
fundamental new physics of some sort.

  John K Clark

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Re: cosmic isotropy of expansion questioned

2020-04-10 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Apr 8, 2020 at 9:48 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

>This could be a game changer in cosmology.
>


https://phys.org/news/2020-04-basic-assumption-universe.html
>

That is really weird! If this turns out to be true then by Noether's
theorem wouldn't that mean the law of Conservation of Angular Momentum is
only approximately correct? Everybody just assumes the law is true but how
accurately has it actually been experimentally tested?

John K Clark

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COVID-19 vaccine development landscape

2020-04-09 Thread John Clark
COVID-19 vaccine development landscape


John K Clark

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Will the summer heat help with the virus?

2020-04-09 Thread John Clark
>From the 9 page report of The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering
and Medicine, sent to the White House:


*“Given current data, we believe that the pandemic likely will not diminish
because of summer, and we should be careful not to base policies and
strategies around the hope that it will. We might very well see a reduction
in spread in the beginning of the summer, but we have to be careful not to
put that down to a changing climate — it is plausible that such a reduction
could be due to other measures put in place. Human behavior will be most
important. If a human coughs or sneezes enough virus close enough to the
next susceptible person, then temperature and humidity just won’t matter
that much. Given that countries currently in ‘summer’ climates, such as
Australia and Iran, are experiencing rapid virus spread, a decrease in
cases with increases in humidity and temperature elsewhere should not be
assumed.”*

John K Clark

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How confirmed cases of coronavirus have spread

2020-04-09 Thread John Clark
Anybody who still thinks the US has not totally bungled its response to the
COVID-19 Coronavirus should watch this animated chart, it's only 53 seconds
long and things don't get really interesting until about second 25, but
then you see its number of cases exploud at an astonishing speed that
dwarfs every other country in the world.

How confirmed cases of coronavirus have spread


As of April 9 2020 at 11:07 GMT 14,820 Americans have died of COVID-19, the
good news is the death numbers are only doubling every 5 days not every 4
as they were before, although even now no country has a higher rate of
virus growth than the US.

 John K Clark

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Ventilators

2020-04-08 Thread John Clark
The good news is that today in the very first contract made under the
Defense Production Act GM was ordered to make 30,000 ventilators for $489.4
million. The bad news is they won't be ready until late August. Pity this
was done on April 8 not January 8. Meanwhile as of 19:17 GMT 14,369
Americans have died of COVID-19 and at its rate of increase in a few hours
it will overtake Spain and become #2 in the total death count category. It
won't take long for the USA to overtake Italy and become #1 because Italy's
death count is now only doubling every 2 weeks, but the USA's death count
is still doubling every 4 days.

John K Clark

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COVID-19 needs a Manhattan Project

2020-04-07 Thread John Clark
A single vaccine factory can cost half a billion dollars and 44
vaccines are in early stage development, and even after you find one that
works and is safe you're going to need billions of doses to vaccinate
everybody. Because nobody else is doing anything Bill Gates picked 7 out of
those 44 that he thought were most promising and decided to build factories
right now for all 7 with full knowledge that he will end up wasting
billions of dollars. Gates said:

"*Even though we’ll end up picking at most two of them, we’re going to fund
factories for all seven, just so that we don’t waste time in serially
saying, ‘OK, which vaccine works?’ and then building the factory. We can
start now by building the facilities where these vaccines will be made.
Because many of the top candidates are made using unique equipment, we’ll
have to build facilities for each of them, knowing that some won’t get
used. Private companies can’t take that kind of risk, but the federal
government can.*"

Gates can take the risk but so can the federal government, and they can do
things on an even larger scale than he can. And we're not going to get back
to normal until a vaccine is found and we're mass producing it. The
following is from an editorial in the March 27 2020 issue of the journal
Science:
==






*"There is an unprecedented race to develop a vaccine against severe acute
respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). With at least 44 vaccines
in early-stage development, what outcome can we expect? Will the first
vaccine to cross the finish line be the safest and most effective? Or will
it be the most well-funded vaccines that first become available, or perhaps
those using vaccine technologies with the fewest regulatory hurdles? The
answer could be a vaccine that ticks all these boxes. If we want to
maximize the chances for success, however, and have enough doses to end the
coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, current piecemeal efforts
won't be enough. If ever there was a case for a coordinated global vaccine
development effort using a “big science” approach, it is now.There is a
strong track record for publicly funded, large-scale scientific endeavors
that bring together global expertise and resources toward a common goal.
The Manhattan Project brought about nuclear weapons quickly (although with
terrible implications for humanity) through an approach that led to
countless changes in how scientists from many countries work together. The
Human Genome Project and CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear
Research) engaged scientists from around the world to drive basic research
from their home labs through local and virtual teamwork. Taking this big,
coordinated approach to developing a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine will not only
potentially save hundreds of thousands of lives, but will also help the
world be better prepared for the next pandemic.An initiative of this scale
won't be easy. Extraordinary sharing of information and resources will be
critical, including data on the virus, the various vaccine candidates,
vaccine adjuvants, cell lines, and manufacturing advances. Allowing
different efforts to follow their own leads during the early stages will
take advantage of healthy competition that is vital to the scientific
endeavor. We must then decide which vaccine candidates warrant further
exploration purely on the basis of scientific merit. This will require
drawing on work already supported by many government agencies, independent
organizations like the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, and
pharmaceutical and biotech companies to ensure that no potentially
important candidate vaccines are missed. Only then can we start to narrow
in on those candidates to be advanced through all clinical trial phases.
This shortlist also needs to be based on which candidates can be developed,
approved, and manufactured most efficiently.*


*Trials need to be carried out in parallel, not sequentially, using
adaptive trial designs, optimized for speed and tested in different
populations—rich and developing countries, from children to the elderly—so
that we can ultimately protect everyone. Because the virus is spreading
quickly, testing will be needed in communities where we can get answers
fast—that means running trials anywhere in the world, not just in preset
testing locations. Working with regulators early in the process will
increase the likelihood of rapid approvals, and then once approved, a
coordinated effort will ensure that sufficient quantities are available to
all who need the vaccine, not just to the highest bidder.*






*All of this will require substantial funding, which is the big ask of big
science. Late-stage clinical trials are not cheap, nor is vaccine
manufacturing. Although new modular manufacturing methods may speed up the
process and cut costs, a single vaccine facility can cost half a billion
dollars. Distribution comes at a cost, too. So, to guarantee sufficient
production of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, 

The death rate

2020-04-04 Thread John Clark
On Wednesday April 1 at 17:34 GMT 4,516 Americans had died from COVID-19
and that is greater than the 4415 that died in the two decade long Iraq
war. On Friday April 3 at 17:00  GMT 6714 Americans had died from COVID-19
and that is greater than the 6637 Americans that had died in the Iraq and
Afghanistan wars combined. And right now, on Saturday April 4 at 16:08 GMT
7847 have die from it, and the US only had its first COVID-19 death on
March 1.

Only 2 countries in the world have a higher number of COVID-19 deaths than
the US, Italy and Spain. Italy's number of deaths is doubling every 10
days. Spain's number of deaths is doubling every 6 days. The number of
deaths in the US is doubling every 3 days, and no nation that has had more
than 25 deaths has a faster doubling time than that. Iran, which not long
ago was considered the prototypical example of a nation that had totally
bungled it's response to the virus, has a doubling time of 2 weeks.

And yet the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo issued a very strange warning yesterday,
it said due to a "significant increase in the number of coronavirus
infections" US citizens should leave Japan. But where are they supposed to
go, back to the US? Japan has 2306 cases of COVID-19 and deaths from it are
doubling every 3 weeks, the US has 291,322cases of COVID-19 and deaths from
it are doubling every 3 days.

Germany has over 90,000 people infected with COVID-19, only the US, Italy
and Spain have more, but for some reason the deaths from it is remarkably
low there, only 1.3%; in comparison the death rate in Italy is 12%, in
Spain it's 10%, in the US it's 2.5%. Part of the reason may be Germany's
aggressive use of testing and their excellent health care system, they tend
to hospitalize people who test positive for the virus even if their
symptoms are mild because they have built lots of intensive care beds for
them and they know their condition can change for the worse very rapidly
and their chances of survival are much better if they're in a hospital when
that happens. The death rate in the US will certainly increase when doctors
start rationing ventilators and are forced to decide who should live and
who should die, and that will probably begin in the next week.

John K Clark

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Re: Aspects of duality between spacetime and QM

2020-04-03 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Apr 3, 2020 at 6:18 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

>>> I recently re-read the paper The Page curve of Hawking radiation from
>>> semiclassical geometry by Almheiri, Mahajan1, Maldacena, and Zhao
>>> arXiv:1908.10996v1. [...]
>>>
>>
>> >> I've got to say Lawrence you seem like you're feeling pretty good. Is
>> that correct?
>> John K Clark
>>
>
> > I never really felt that sick. I have had a loss of smell, though that
> has returned, and the tightness in my chest and the cough are less. I had
> at one point a very mild temperature of 99-deg F.  I am not sure if I had,
> or am getting over, Covid-19, but I sort of hope so.
>

That loss of smell is the giveaway, it sounds like you had a very mild case
and so are probably now immune from COVID-19. You are one lucky man!

 John K Clark




>

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Re: Aspects of duality between spacetime and QM

2020-04-03 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Apr 3, 2020 at 11:45 AM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> I recently re-read the paper The Page curve of Hawking radiation from
> semiclassical geometry by Almheiri, Mahajan1, Maldacena, and Zhao
> arXiv:1908.10996v1. [...]
>

I've got to say Lawrence you seem like you're feeling pretty good. Is that
correct?

John K Clark


>

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Re: Pauli's Exclusion Principle

2020-04-03 Thread John Clark
On Thu, Apr 2, 2020 at 9:09 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> Does the Pauli's Exclusion Principle have a similar status in QM as
> Born's rule; namely, an empirical fact not derivable from the postulates of
> QM? TIA, AG*
>

Yes.

John K Clark

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A Cliff Notes version of Bill Gates COVID-19 talk

2020-03-26 Thread John Clark
Month of February was wasted 

I admire Bill Gates for many reasons, one of them is that no human being
has saved more lives than he has. And few people have thought longer or
more deeply about global pandemics than he has. Here are some Bill Gates
quotations from his recent talk:

*“It is really tragic that the economic effects of this are very dramatic.
Nothing like this has ever happened to the economy in our lifetimes. But
money, you know bringing the economy back and doing money, that’s more of a
reversible thing than bringing people back to life. And so we’re going to
take the pain in the economic dimension — huge pain — in order to minimize
the pain in the disease and death dimension. It’s very irresponsible for
somebody to suggest that we can have the best of both worlds. There is no
middle course on this thing."*

*"It’s very tough to say to people, ‘Hey keep going to restaurants, go buy
new houses, ignore that pile of bodies over in the corner, we want you to
keep spending because there’s some politician that thinks GDP growth is
what counts. It’s hard to tell people during and epidemic … that they
should go about things knowing their activity is spreading this disease"*

*"Many countries had not taken advantage of the month of February.  South
Korea’s approach to mass testing was a lesson everyone should learn from.
South Korea took advantage of February, built up the testing capacity and
they were able to contact trace, and the infections have gone down even
without the type of shutdown that, because we’re late, we’re having to do.”*

*“The problem wasn’t that there was a system that didn’t work well enough.
The problem was that we didn’t have a system at all. It’s too late to avoid
a coronavirus shutdown. The U.S. is past this opportunity to control the
coronavirus without shutdown. We did not act fast enough to have an ability
to avoid the shutdown. It’s disastrous for the economy, but the sooner you
do it in a tough way, the sooner you can undo it and go back to normal"*

*"**China is seeing very few cases now because their testing and shut down
was very effective. If a country does a good job with testing and shut down
then within 6-10 weeks they should see very few cases and be able to open
back up."*

 *“If you’re doing isolation well nationally, within about 20 days you’ll
see those numbers of new cases really change, i.e., go down, …and that is a
sign that you’re on your way.  **This is not going to be easy. We need a
clear message about that.”*

John K Clark

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Re: Bill Gates new talk on COVID-19

2020-03-25 Thread John Clark
That new Bill Gates Ted Talk on COVID-19 has moved, I think it's really
important , it's now at:

Month of February was wasted  

John K Clark

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Bill Gates new talk on COVID-19

2020-03-25 Thread John Clark
Bill Gates just gave a new Ted Talk via video conferencing, it starts to
get really interesting about 4 minutes in, even more interesting 20 minutes
in. Gates says it's too late for the US to avoid virtually shutting down
the economy for 6 to 10 weeks if it wants to avoid 3 to 5 million deaths
from COVID-19. For reference, 407 thousand American soldiers died in WW2.

Bill Gates on COVID-19


John K Clark

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-03-23 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 10:54 AM Alan Grayson 
wrote:


> *> Krauss, for example, says the universe was "a billionth of a billionth
> the size of a proton" before inflation began.*


Krauss was talking about the size of the observable universe, the size of
the un-observable universe before inflation was certainly larger than that,
but how much larger is unknown, it might have been infinite. Or it might
not.

John K Clark





>
> On Monday, March 23, 2020 at 8:16:15 AM UTC-6, John Clark wrote:
>>
>> On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 12:55 AM Alan Grayson 
>> wrote:
>>
>> *> According to some cosmologists, Krauss?, the duration of inflation is
>>> about 10^-35 seconds, which is presumably the duration necessary to create
>>> isotropy and homogeneity in a universe of age 13.8 BY. If these assumptions
>>> are correct, can we use them to compute the fraction of the universe which
>>> is now UN-observable? TIA, AG*
>>>
>>
>> I don't see how. For all we know the UN-observable part might be
>> infinite, or it might not be.
>>
>>  John K Clark
>>
>
> Krauss, for example, says the universe was "a billionth of a billionth the
> size of a proton" before inflation began. So, assuming it was always
> expanding at a constant rate, albeit possibly changing in time, for a
> finite time of 13.8 BY, the total size could never have been infinite in
> spatial extent. AG
>
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>

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Re: Inflation and the total size of the universe

2020-03-23 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Mar 23, 2020 at 12:55 AM Alan Grayson 
wrote:

*> According to some cosmologists, Krauss?, the duration of inflation is
> about 10^-35 seconds, which is presumably the duration necessary to create
> isotropy and homogeneity in a universe of age 13.8 BY. If these assumptions
> are correct, can we use them to compute the fraction of the universe which
> is now UN-observable? TIA, AG*
>

I don't see how. For all we know the UN-observable part might be infinite,
or it might not be.

 John K Clark

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Folding At Home and COVID-19

2020-03-22 Thread John Clark
The Folding@Home network is now putting all its effort into finding small
molecules that could interfere with the COVID-19 virus and it can now reach
470 PetaFLOPS. Summit, the world's largest supercomputer can only do 149
PetaFLOPS.

Folding @Home Now More Powerful Than World's Top 7 Supercomputers Combined


John K Clark

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It's totally under control

2020-03-20 Thread John Clark
I've done a Great Job 10 out of 10


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A interview with Alan Guth, the man who invented inflation

2020-03-11 Thread John Clark
Alan H. Guth - How Significant is an Expanding Universe?


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Re: Why physics has become fantasy fiction

2020-03-09 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 7:25 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

 > *Why can't superposition be interpreted to mean that each alternative
> has a probability of occurrence and nothing more? *


Because if a particle undergoes a reaction but I DON'T look at it and then
let the particle undergo another reaction and then look at it I get one
outcome, but if a particle undergoes a reaction but I DO look at it and
then let the particle undergo another reaction and look at it I get a
completely different reaction. If I start at the very beginning and want to
calculate the outcome at the very end it matters if I looked at anything in
the middle or not. This is the measurement problem, and Many Worlds is the
only quantum interpretation that even tries to give an explanation for this
bizarre behavior, Copenhagen basically says just shut up and calculate. And
that works fine if you're a engineer and have no interest in the
philosophical implications, but for others not so much.

John K Clark

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Re: The Fermi Paradox

2020-03-07 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 12:30 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

*after the so called Hadean period of mass bombardment life emerged within
> a few 100 million years. Given that time periods tend to telescope the
> early you go in geological history this is fairly quick. *


Given that we have only one example to work with there is no way of knowing
if that is typical or not. Life could have Evolved freakishly quickly on
Earth because in at least one way we know the example is not typical, not
only did it eventually produce life it eventually produced intelligent
life. And bacteria only planets must far outnumber amoeba planets, and
amoeba planets must far outnumber worm planets, and worm planets must far
outnumber monkey planets, and monkey planets must far outnumber planets
with beings who make radio telescopes. I think the most obvious explanation
for the Fermi Paradox is probably the correct one, we're the first, after
all somebody has to be.

 John K Clark

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Re: The Fermi Paradox

2020-03-07 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 7:54 AM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> The occurrence of life on Earth in such a rapid time does pose a
> possibility for a fairly rapid occurrence, at least on a geological time
> scale. for life.


Life needs water and liquid water has existed on the Earth for 4.4 billion
years.

Evidence from zircons for the existence of oceans on the Earth 4.4 Gyr ago


Even though it had liquid water there is no evidence life existed on Earth
until 900 million years had passed, and even then it was just bacteria. It
took another 800 million years before the first eukaryotes evolved, and 2
billion years after that before the first multicellular creatures evolved,
and 700 million years after that before creatures with the ability to make
radio telescopes evolved. That doesn't seem very rapid to me, the sun will
start to turn into a red giant in about 500 million years, so if the
process had been a bit slower we'd be going extinct along with everything
else on the planet when we had achieved about the same level of technology
that we have now.

 John K Clark

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Re: Parallel Worlds Probably Exist. Here’s Why

2020-03-07 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 8:50 AM Philip Thrift  wrote:

> *The Schrödinger equation is just a neural network.*


Just?! You're a neural network too, and some neural networks, like some
equations, can predict what a physical system will do with 14 digits of
precision, and some can't.

John K Clark

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Re: Parallel Worlds Probably Exist. Here’s Why

2020-03-07 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Mar 7, 2020 at 7:10 AM Philip Thrift  wrote:


>>"The most elegant interpretation of quantum mechanics is the universe is
>> constantly splitting."
>
>
> *> A joke, right?*
>

Yes if you think the Schrodinger equation meaning what it says is funny.
Personally I wouldn't consider that to be a knee slapper but comedy is a
purely subjective matter.

John K Clark

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Parallel Worlds Probably Exist. Here’s Why

2020-03-06 Thread John Clark
This video just went online, I thought it was excellent:

Parallel Worlds Probably Exist. Here’s Why


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The Fermi Paradox

2020-03-06 Thread John Clark
Galactic clusters are the largest structures in the universe held together
by gravity and the Ophiuchus Supercluster contains 4021 known galaxies,
it's likely none of them contain life, much less intelligent life.
Telescopes have seen evidence that the largest galaxy in the center of the
cluster underwent a gargantuan explosion at least 240 million years
earlier, it's 390 million light years away so the explosion happened at
least 630 million years ago. It's thought that 270 million solar masses of
gas and dust was sucked into the black hole at the center of the galaxy
producing something equivalent to a supernova going off every month for a
100 million years. Something like that would probably sterilize not only
the galaxy but the entire cluster. And Ophiuchus is relatively nearby so
it's almost certain there are more distant clusters that suffered even
larger explosions. It looks like the Milky Way has just been lucky.

DISCOVERY OF A GIANT RADIO FOSSIL IN THE OPHIUCHUS GALAXY CLUSTER


John K Clark

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The biggest bang since the big one

2020-03-01 Thread John Clark
In the February 27 2020 Astrophysical Journal evidence is presented that in
the distant past in a super giant galaxy 400 million light years away there
was an explosion that released 100 billion times as much energy as the sun
will during its entire lifetime.

Discovery of a Giant Radio Fossil in the Ophiuchus Galaxy Cluster


John K Clark

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Re: Corvid-19

2020-02-28 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Feb 28, 2020 at 1:32 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> What happens if the 2020 election is cancelled because of the danger of
> spreading the virus? AG *
>

What happens if the virus turns out to be less serious than
currently thought but Trump uses it as an excuse to cancel the election
anyway? Historically even the Civil War wasn't considered an extreme enough
emergency to cancel an election, but Trump may have other ideas.

A lot depends on how extensive the infection really is and that is a big
unknown due to the irresponsibly slow response by the American government
in making DNA Corvid-19 testing kits. South Korea, a country with one
seventh the population of the USA, has tested 66,652 of its people and
found 1766 confirmed cases. The USA has 60 confirmed cases (not 15 as Trump
said in his press conference) but due to the severe shortage of test kits
to this day only 445 Americans have ever been tested, the city of Hong Kong
alone tests 1000 of its citizens every day but the entire USA can't manage
half of that. Only about a dozen state and local health departments in the
USA have any testing kits at all and are so rare they must be carefully
rationed, California with a population of 40 million only has 200 kits.
Meanwhile South Korea manufactures thousands of kits a day because they
took this pandemic seriously from day one.

One more thing, it may mean nothing but today the Pope canceled his regular
schedule due to a "slight indisposition". Italy has the highest Corvid-19
rate in Europe and during Ash Wednesday mass the Pope was seen coughing and
blowing his nose, he later shook hands with people and kissed a baby
although for some reason when he net with a group of visiting Bishops they
did not embrace him or kiss his ring as is customary.

John K Clark

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Corvid-19

2020-02-27 Thread John Clark
China says the spread of Corvid-19 is slowing down, but it's not clear if
their statistics can be trusted, even if they can be China has used brutal
measures to contain it, like locking down 760 million people which is more
than half the population and virtually blockading Wutan, a city larger than
any in the USA; such measures are unlikely to be repeated in the west.
Meanwhile South Korea, who's statistics don't have the same cloud of
suspicion on them that those in China have, reports the virus is spreading
faster than it is in China. Iran says 139 people have been infected
including the deputy health minister and 19 have died, and those two just
numbers don't make sense together. Iran also said 24 people were arrested
for "virus rumour-mongering", and that may give you a clue as to the
reliability of their statistics.

On a unrelated matter (well... maybe not entirely unrelated) are there any
constitutional scholars out there? What happens if a presidential candidate
dies after being nominated but before the election, or dies after winning
the election but before being sworn in? I ask because Bernie Sanders,
Donald Trump, Mike Bloomberg, Elizabeth Warren and Joe Biden are all in
their 70's, most of them their late 70's.

John K Clark

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We're not ready

2020-02-26 Thread John Clark
Only 1.9% of the people who got the 1918 flu died of it,  but so many got
sick it ended up killing 675,000 people in the USA alone and 35 million
worldwide. Because it's so new the death rate for the Corvid 19 virus is
more uncertain but it's estimated to be between 2% and 6%, and it shows a
disturbingly long incubation period during which a person is infectious but
displays no obvious symptoms of being ill; it can be diagnosed with DNA
detection kits but those are in extremely short supply. Administering large
amounts of Corvid-19 antibodies would almost certainly cut the death rate
considerably but you'd need massive amounts of it and, like DNA detection
kits, we no longer have the infrastructure to rapidly mass produce it.

Obama created a pandemic czar to deal with just this sort of thing and to
coordinate the activities of the various federal agencies, but in the
spring of 2018 the pandemic czar position was eliminated and the entire
chain of command was fired, and the disease fighting budgets of the Centers
for Disease Control, the National Safety Council, the Department of
Homeland Security, and Health and Human Services was cut by 15 billion
dollars. The infrastructure can be rebuilt but that takes not just money
but also time, and that is time we may not have. In 2017 Bill Gates told
national security advisor H.R. McMaster that cutting the disease fighting
budgets of federal agencies would "*significantly increase the probability
of a large and lethal modern-day pandemic occurring in our lifetimes*".
Maybe Corvid-19 will just peter out but I wouldn't count on it, it's
looking increasingly likely that Mr. Gates was right. We're not ready.

John K Clark

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Re: The trouble with transporters

2020-02-26 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 1:20 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

Obviously your genome would be necessary but not sufficient, memories would
have to be included too, but there would be no need to know the position
and momentum of every electron in your body down to the limit that
Heisenberg imposed.

 John K Clark



>

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Re: The trouble with transporters

2020-02-26 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 1:13 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

*> Quantum teleportation is the way to go. Of course the problem of getting
> every atom of a person entangled with other states is tough.*


It seems to me if you just want to make a Star Trek style teleporter that
would be vast overkill.

John K Clark




>

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Re: The trouble with transporters

2020-02-26 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Feb 26, 2020 at 6:54 AM Philip Thrift  wrote:

*>Instead of capturing all of the information down to the atomic level,
> they suggested transmitting just the DNA information of a person, along
> with a brain state. If you had that information, you could presumably clone
> a person and then implant them with the mental state of their previous
> self. It's not exactly teleportation, but it gets the job done. Only, even
> that fraction of what makes up a person comes in at 2.6 tredecillion
> [10^42] bits. Which is, in scientific vernacular, several boatloads. The
> estimated time to transmit, using the standard 30 GHz microwave band used
> by communications satellites, would take 350,000 times longer than the age
> of the universe.*


What the hell! How in the world did you come up with those numbers?!  In
the entire human genome there are only 3 billion base pairs, there are 4
bases so each base can represent 2 bits, there are 8 bits per byte so that
comes out to 750 meg which you could fit on a old fashioned CD audio disk.
Yes you'd have to add memory to that genomic information but the human
retina can only transmit data at about 10^6 bits per second to the brain
and that is the most information rich of the senses. A billion seconds is
32 years so the brain of a man of that age would have received 10^15 bits
from his eyes. Even if every bit of that information had been retained in
long term memory, which virtually no brain researcher thinks is anywhere
close to being true, that is still ONE HELL OF A LONG WAY from 10^42!!

 John K Clark

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Re: Randomness of quantum processes and computability

2020-02-25 Thread John Clark
On Tue, Feb 25, 2020 at 8:34 AM Bruno Marchal  wrote:

>> I have a halting oracle machine and it has 2 input slots, one slot for
>> the logical blueprints of a computer in digital form and the other slot for
>> a program, also in digital form, to run on that computer. The oracle
>> machine will then output either the words "Halt" or "Not Halt" depending on
>> what a program running on that computer will do. I decide to use the oracle
>> machine as one part of a new 3 part machine I will call machine X. The
>> first part of machine X is just a photocopier that makes two copies of its
>> input and then feeds them into the 2 input slots of the oracle machine. The
>> last part of machine X is the negator, if it receives a "Not Halt" input
>> from the oracle machine then the negator will output "Halt" and then
>> stop, if the negator receives a "Halt" input from the oracle the negator
>> will go into an infinite loop and never stop. The entire X machine as
>> constructed has one input slot and one output slot.
>> I will now input machine X with machine X's own blueprints, so after the
>> photocopier has done its work the oracle machine will receive identical
>> inputs in both slots and the oracle machine will have to figure out what
>> will happen to the X machine when the X machine is fed it's own blueprint
>> as input. If the oracle says under those circumstances the X machine will
>> halt then the X machine will never halt, and if the oracle says the X
>> machine will not halt then the X machine will print "Halt" and stop. So the
>> halting oracle machine always makes predictions that are wrong. So there is
>> no such thing as a halting oracle machine. QED.
>
>
> *> This shows that the machine+halting-oracle cannot solve the halting
> (machine+halting-oracle) problem,*
>

Yes, it can't solve the halting problem.

* > but the halting-oracle is supposed fro be concerned only for the
> machine halting problem, i.e. the machine without oracle. *
>

Supposed? That's a rather silly thing to say, if the oracle machine is well
defined and the machine is well defined then the new combined machine is
also well defined and the so called halting oracle fails miserably when it
tries to predict if this new well defined machine will halt or not.

John K Clark

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Re: Randomness of quantum processes and computability

2020-02-24 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Feb 24, 2020 at 8:40 AM Bruno Marchal  wrote:

>> a Halting oracle produces paradoxes,
>
>
> *> I don’t see why you say this.*
>

I have a halting oracle machine and it has 2 input slots, one slot for the
logical blueprints of a computer in digital form and the other slot for a
program, also in digital form, to run on that computer. The oracle machine
will then output either the words "Halt" or "Not Halt" depending on what a
program running on that computer will do. I decide to use the oracle
machine as one part of a new 3 part machine I will call machine X. The
first part of machine X is just a photocopier that makes two copies of its
input and then feeds them into the 2 input slots of the oracle machine. The
last part of machine X is the negator, if it receives a "Not Halt" input
from the oracle machine then the negator will output "Halt" and then stop,
if the negator receives a "Halt" input from the oracle the negator will go
into an infinite loop and never stop. The entire X machine as constructed
has one input slot and one output slot.

I will now input machine X with machine X's own blueprints, so after the
photocopier has done its work the oracle machine will receive identical
inputs in both slots and the oracle machine will have to figure out what
will happen to the X machine when the X machine is fed it's own blueprint
as input. If the oracle says under those circumstances the X machine will
halt then the X machine will never halt, and if the oracle says the X
machine will not halt then the X machine will print "Halt" and stop. So the
halting oracle machine always makes predictions that are wrong. So there is
no such thing as a halting oracle machine. QED.

John K Clark

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Re: Mecanism, God, the Soul, and other silly secret sauce theories

2020-02-24 Thread John Clark
On Mon, Feb 24, 2020 at 10:05 AM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

> The best I can think of is with the Taoist issue with nothingness. Does
> nothingness exist? If it does exist then it is not really nothing, and if
> it does not exist then there must be something. The conclusion then is that
> nothingness is self-contradictory.


The best definition of "nothingness" I've ever heard is infinite unbounded
homogeneity.

John K Clark



>

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Mecanism, God, the Soul, and other silly secret sauce theories

2020-02-24 Thread John Clark
On Sun, Feb 23, 2020 at 9:32 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> IMO, there's nothing mysterious about Bruno's definition of mechanism.
> It's what's generally believed by most physicists; namely, that everything
> in the universe can be explained by the interaction of particles (and
> waves), *


Or to say the same thing more simply, every event has a cause, there is no
logical reason that must be true but it's a good working assumption to
start with. All physicists think its true except at the quantum level, and
with 2 exceptions even religious people think it's true; the exceptions are
the Soul's actions and God's actions which they think are events without a
cause, which is the very definition of random.

Yet in direct contradiction to that religious people are constantly talking
about the logical reasons, the causes, for God's actions. For example they
believe God made the hurricane hit the city BECAUSE he was angry. Why was
God angry? God was angry because of gay marriage. Why would gay marriage
make God angry? Because it's morally wrong. What makes something morally
wrong?. It's unclear how religious people think this chain of questions
will terminate or even if they think it will terminate at all, to tell the
truth I don't think most have even given it any thought.

>> Self-duplication is made possible by the Digital Mechanism. If you agree
>> that with self-duplication,
>
>
*> I don't. *


So you believe in the 18'th century idea of vitalism, the idea that
everything interesting about the universe is caused by a secret sauce that
science can never explain. But strangely you do believe you're the same
person you were a year ago even though the atoms you had in your body then
have all been replaced by new atoms. For reasons never made clear you think
that doesn't count. I must conclude that you don't believe in
self-duplication for emotional reasons not intelectual ones, the same
reason you don't believe in the Many Worlds quantum interpretation.

*> **there's no way that arithmetic alone can CREATE space and time. *


There is no way arithmetic alone can create ANYTHING, but bizarrely Bruno
believes it can. That's why I say although he uses the word constantly I
have no idea what Bruno means by "mechanism".

*> A computer can create "points" in a hypothetical grid, and various types
> of distance formulas, but it cannot* [...]


A computer is NOT "arithmetic alone", a computer is made of matter and uses
energy. Bruno is the one who thinks arithmetic alone can do things not me,
in fact he thinks it can do everything.

* > **what's your definition of physicalism?*


I have none, I never use the word and have no use for it.

John K Clark

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Re: Randomness of quantum processes and computability

2020-02-23 Thread John Clark
On Sun, Feb 23, 2020 at 7:12 AM Bruno Marchal  wrote:

*> The BB is computable already with the Halting oracle*


But a Halting oracle produces paradoxes, and I don't just mean weird
situations I mean genuine logical contradictions.

John K Clark

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Wittgenstein's silliness

2020-02-23 Thread John Clark
On Thursday, February 20, 2020 at 8:58:15 AM UTC-6, Lawrence Crowell wrote:

*>  Language as with any symbolic system is incomplete. So any symbolic
> structure will by Gödel's theorem be incapable of proving it's consistency.
> Wittgenstein seemed to recognize this and backed away from his Tractus.*


He backed away from Tractatus but not in the right direction. Some people,
including me, have lost a lot of respect for Wittgenstein due to the so
called "notorious paragraph" in his book "Remarks on the Foundations of
Mathematics" which he wrote 20 years after Tractatus. Wittgenstein says:

"I imagine someone asking my advice; he says: “I have constructed a
proposition (I will use ‘P’ to designate it) in Russell’s symbolism, and by
means of certain definitions and transformations it can be so interpreted
that it says ‘P is not provable in Russell’s system’. Must I not say that
this proposition on the one hand is true, and on the other hand is
unprovable? For suppose it were false; then it is true that it is provable.
And that surely cannot be! And if it is proved, then it is proved that is
not provable. Thus it can only be true, but unprovable.” Just as we ask,
“‘Provable’ in what system?”, so we must also ask, “‘true’ in what system?”
‘True in Russell’s system’ means, as was said: proved in Russell’s system;
and ‘false in Russell’s system’ means: the opposite has been proved in
Russell’s system. – Now what does your “suppose it is false” mean? In the
Russell sense it means ‘suppose the opposite is proved in Russell’s system’"

Wittgenstein seems to equate proof with truth and think a bridge has
collapsed in one logical system and the same bridge has NOT collapsed in
another logical system. It's silliness like this that gives philosophy a
bad name. To answer Wittgenstein's question "True in what system?" I would
say true in the ultimate system, physical reality. The variables that make
up the bridge have either caused it to reach a lower level of potential
energy (aka collapsed) or they have not. And if the pattern of physical
electrical charges inside a physical computer are set up in such a way that
it will detonate an H-bomb when it finds 3 integers that satisfy the
equation X^3 +Y^3 =Z^3 then it is true that the physical computer will
never set off the physical bomb. That's why I say mathematics is just a
language and physics is more fundamental than mathematics and is the
ultimate arbiter of truth.

John K Clark

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Re: Powerful antibiotics discovered using AI

2020-02-22 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Feb 22, 2020 at 2:31 PM Philip Thrift  wrote:

>
>
> On Saturday, February 22, 2020 at 1:20:28 PM UTC-6, Philip Thrift wrote:
>>
>>
>>
>> On Saturday, February 22, 2020 at 9:00:08 AM UTC-6, John Clark wrote:
>>>
>>> On Sat, Feb 22, 2020 at 2:53 AM Philip Thrift 
>>> wrote:
>>>
>>> > *Name one thing that is explained by science.*
>>>
>>>
>>> Explain what you mean by explain. I'll tell you what I mean by the word,
>>> describing something complex in terms of something simpler so well that
>>> accurate predictions can be made.
>>>
>>> *> Here is the code for the Standard Model.* [lots of math follows]
>>>
>>>
>>> There is no doubt about it, that is one hell of a lot of complex stuff,
>>> but it's not nearly as complex as all the stuff the Standard Model can
>>> "explain" as I define the word in the above.
>>>
>>> > *What if it were 1 times bigger?*
>>>
>>>
>>> It would still be cheap at twice the price.
>>>
>>> John K Clark
>>>
>>

Explain what you mean by explain. I'll tell you what I mean by the word,
>> describing something complex in terms of something simpler so well that
>> accurate predictions can be made.
>
>
>
> A theory T_b in a language L_b can be explained in terms of a theory  T_a
> in a language L_a if T_b/L_b can be *translated into* or *compiled to* or 
> *interpreted
> by* or *derived from* T_a/T_b.


That's not you own words and it's not as useful as my meaning because your
quotation allows for the possibility the explanation could make things more
complex not simpler, and if that were true then explanations wouldn't have
any point, Apparently even you don't agree with that quotation because you
indicated science can't explain anything, and that is obviously untrue
under either meaning of the word. And next time let's hear your own words
rather than some quotation you found on Google 30 seconds ago.

John K Clark

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Re: Powerful antibiotics discovered using AI

2020-02-22 Thread John Clark
On Sat, Feb 22, 2020 at 2:53 AM Philip Thrift  wrote:

> *Name one thing that is explained by science.*


Explain what you mean by explain. I'll tell you what I mean by the word,
describing something complex in terms of something simpler so well that
accurate predictions can be made.

*> Here is the code for the Standard Model.* [lots of math follows]


There is no doubt about it, that is one hell of a lot of complex stuff, but
it's not nearly as complex as all the stuff the Standard Model can
"explain" as I define the word in the above.

> *What if it were 1 times bigger?*


It would still be cheap at twice the price.

John K Clark

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Re: Powerful antibiotics discovered using AI

2020-02-22 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Feb 21, 2020 Brent Meeker' via Everything List <
everything-list@googlegroups.com> wrote:

*> this is nothing new.*


And so just before he was vaporized the last surviving human turned to the
Jupiter Brain and said "I still think I'm smarter than you".

John K Clark

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Re: Randomness of quantum processes and computability

2020-02-22 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Feb 21, 2020 at 9:02 PM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*>>> how does mechanism reduce the apparent indeterminacy to the
>>> computable?*
>>
>>
>> >> Determinism doesn't mean every fact is computable.
>>
>
> *> I was referring to "mechanism" as Bruno defines it; namely, that a
> human being can be replicated by a computer. AG*
>

I was never sure what Bruno meant by the word but if that's what you mean
then the answer to your original question above is obvious, Chaos Theory
and the fact that calculations take time and you can't know what the result
of a calculation you're making will be until you've finished making the
calculation.

 John K Clark

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Powerful antibiotics discovered using AI

2020-02-21 Thread John Clark
Powerful antibiotics discovered using AI


John K Clark

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Re: Randomness of quantum processes and computability

2020-02-21 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Feb 21, 2020 at 8:25 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> how does mechanism reduce the apparent indeterminacy to the computable?*


Determinism doesn't mean every fact is computable. We know for certain the
first 5 Busy Beaver numbers are 0, 1, 4, 6 and 13, but after that things
get dicey. Someday we *might* be able to prove the 6th one is 4098 (it
can't be smaller) and we know the 7th Busy Beaver number can't be smaller
than 1.29*10^865. And we can prove that even with infinite computing power
nobody will ever be able to know what the 1919'th Busy Beaver number is, it
hasn't been proven but I wouldn't be surprised if the same thing was true
for the 6th.


> *> On of the things I seriously dislike about MW, which makes it utterly
> REPELLENT (Steven Weinberg's word), is that there are too many damned
> worlds! *


Repellent is a very emotional word, and I think that's the primary reason
MW didn't become the standard quantum interpretation 50 years ago, it was
rejected for emotional reasons not intelectual ones. But nature is what it
is and doesn't take our delicate sensibilities into account before deciding
what to be.

John K Clark

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Re: Postulate: Everything that CAN happen, MUST happen.

2020-02-11 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 7:51 PM Lawrence Crowell <
goldenfieldquaterni...@gmail.com> wrote:

*> MWI is sworn by a number of physicists, though Copenhagen still holds it
> own and Qubism is growing adherents.*


I can't see any big fundamental difference between Copenhagen and Qubism,
they both say the only important thing is making predictions and you
shouldn't even try to form a mental picture of what's really going on
because nothing is really going on; science is predicting that if you
change your experimental apparatus in a certain way then the needle on a
voltmeter will move from a 7 to a 8, and that's it, that's the only
conclusion about the nature of reality you can make. It's hard for me to
believe that anyone who believed that could devote their lives to science
because if it were true it would make science an incredibly dull enterprise.

 John K Clark

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Re: Postulate: Everything that CAN happen, MUST happen.

2020-02-11 Thread John Clark
On Fri, Feb 7, 2020 at 7:16 PM Bruce Kellett  wrote:

*> Many-worlds is incompatible with the Born rule*


A derivation of the Born Rule in the context of the Everett (ManyWorlds)
approach to quantum mechanics 

John K Clark

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Graphene

2020-02-11 Thread John Clark
High quality Graphene (sheets of carbon only one atom thick) is 200 times
stronger than the strongest steel and yet its lighter (2.27 grams per cubic
centimeter compared with 7.75 for steel's lightest alloy), and it's a much
better conductor of heat and electricity than steel or even copper. But
making Graphene had been notoriously expensive because it took so much
energy and could only be made in very small amounts. In the January 27 2020
issue of  the journal Nature Duy X Luong and associates report on a new way
to make it that would use only $100 worth of electricity for each ton of
high quality Graphene produced. In addition the new method requires no
furnace or solvents and produced no reactive waste gases, they make it by
vaporizing carbon with a powerful electrical current in a vacuum chamber.
And the starting carbon feedstock need not be purified, they say they can
literally make high quality Graphene from garbage.

Gram-scale bottom-up flash graphene synthesis


A new company called "Universal Matter" has already started up to
commercialize this discovery.  A space elevator anyone?

Universal Matter 

John K Clark

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Re: An advance in Nanotechnology

2020-02-06 Thread John Clark
One correction, I said "they could get angstrom (10^-9 meter) level spatial
resolution" but it's better than that because an angstrom is actually
10^-10 meters not 10^-9.

John K Clark

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An advance in Nanotechnology

2020-02-06 Thread John Clark
Atomic scale resolution has been achieved for several decades with Scanning
Tunneling Microscopes, they work by moving the tip of a super sharp needle
and measuring the tunneling current induced by quantum fluctuations. The
tunneling current is extremely sensitive to the distance between the needle
and the sample so you get excellent spatial resolution, but unfortunately
you also get very poor temporal resolution. In the January 24 2020 issue of
the journal Science Garg and Kern report on a way to overcome this problem,
they could get angstrom (10^-9 meter) level spatial resolution and
attosecond (10^-18 second) temporal resolution. They found that by
illuminating the tip of the needle with ultrashort Laser pulses they could
greatly enhance the induced tunneling current and, unlike the normal
tunneling current, it would have a well defined phase.

In addition the editors of Science speculate that "quantum computing
protocols might harness the coherent tunneling phase"  that Garg and Kern
have discovered.

*Abstract*

*Nanoelectronic devices operating in the quantum regime require coherent
manipulation and control over electrons at atomic length and time scales.
We demonstrate coherent control over electrons in a tunnel junction of a
scanning tunneling microscope by means of precise tuning of the
carrier-envelope phase of two-cycle long (<6-femtosecond) optical pulses.
We explore photon and field-driven tunneling, two different regimes of
interaction of optical pulses with the tunnel junction, and demonstrate a
transition from one regime to the other. Our results show that it is
possible to induce, track, and control electronic current at atomic scales
with subfemtosecond resolution, providing a route to develop petahertz
coherent nanoelectronics and microscopy.*

Attosecond coherent manipulation of electrons in tunneling microscopy


John K Clark
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Re: Are there Infinite Versions of You?

2020-02-05 Thread John Clark
On Wed, Feb 5, 2020 at 6:46 AM Alan Grayson  wrote:

*> Poincare Recurrence doesn't apply for a universe with uncountably many
> possible states.*
>

If there are a uncountably infinite number of possible states then there is
certainly a countably infinite number of states too. And if there are a
countably infinite number of states then there is certainly a finite number
of states too; 10^10^10^10^100 or any other finite number you care to name.
As far as Poincare Recurrence is concerned uncountably infinite possible
states for the universe to be in is *VAST* overkill.

John K Clark

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