[FairfieldLife] Great Idea

2013-11-09 Thread TurquoiseB
http://www.dailydot.com/technology/wikipedia-zero-data-internet/
http://www.dailydot.com/technology/wikipedia-zero-data-internet/

I don't know how many of you were around on the Internet before it was
called that, and before it had graphical user interfaces in the form of
the World Wide Web.

The earliest Net databases worked exactly this way. I was an early
user of the Internet Movie Database (IMDB), back when to use it you had
to send an email message to a certain address, and enter your query in a
certain syntax in either the message Subject line or its content. Then
the IMDB would email you back the results of your query.

Sounds primitive these days, but this solution is aimed at areas of the
world that are still primitive, in that they are not connected 24/7 to
the WWW.





Re: [FairfieldLife] Great Idea

2013-11-09 Thread Bhairitu
Before there was IMDB there were CDs with movie databases on them.  I 
had a couple of those.  They ran on DOS.  Amazon owns IMDB which is why 
if a movie is available on disc or streaming it's an Amazon link shown.


Back around 1998 when I was doing some Palm Pilot development they 
started offering services where you could get small bits of data over a 
Palm phone (Symbian was producing phones with the Palm OS on them).


There are also projects to help get the Internet to primitive place 
including one college project that was going to do it over AM and FM 
radio frequencies.  WiMax could be done in a lot of countries cheaply 
but as usual some big companies want in on the action which is why it 
isn't happening.  It's like open source voting machines.  Microsoft is 
terrified of the public knowing there is such a thing as a free OS, one 
that can be reviewed by techs to see if it has been tampered with.  So 
they apparently spread all kinds of lies about how an open source OS 
would be bad on a voting machine (since Windows is used on them).


On 11/09/2013 09:18 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:


http://www.dailydot.com/technology/wikipedia-zero-data-internet/

I don't know how many of you were around on the Internet before it was 
called that, and before it had graphical user interfaces in the form 
of the World Wide Web.


The earliest Net databases worked exactly this way. I was an early 
user of the Internet Movie Database (IMDB), back when to use it you 
had to send an email message to a certain address, and enter your 
query in a certain syntax in either the message Subject line or its 
content. Then the IMDB would email you back the results of your query.


Sounds primitive these days, but this solution is aimed at areas of 
the world that are still primitive, in that they are not connected 
24/7 to the WWW.