Re: [MCN-L] 360-Projection Examples and Experience

2015-11-04 Thread Jason Jay Stevens
The installation at the Institute of Texan Cultures is a rare and impressive 
example of immersive theater. The original production was about culture, not 
science, btw.

The Eames produced something very similar in their famous World Fair Expo 
pavilion for IBM in 1964. The World Expo 67 in Montreal featured a whole range 
of alternative, immersive moving image exhibits along these lines. You can find 
film of both on youTube. The immersive theater at the ITC comes from the same 
era — produced for the Hemisfair in 1968.

If you widen your search beyond the moving image, per se, you can trace the 
whole medium back to to the big panorama rotundas of the 19th century. These 
often served the same purpose as the NYTimes product, in that they frequently 
portrayed "current events" (the definition of "current" has changed!) from far 
off places, especially military campaigns.

This is a focus of my longterm research, as well as a medium I have worked in 
artistically, and I love talking about this stuff. Feel free to get in touch if 
you want to discuss it more!
On that note, what is your end goal with this research?

Cheers,
Jason


Jason Jay Stevens
Flutter & Wow Museum Projects

1013 Fountain Street #1
Ann Arbor MI 48103

210.364.6305

> On Nov 4, 2015, at 9:15 AM, Tina Shah <tsh...@artic.edu> wrote:
> 
> Hi, here are a couple of examples from the Electronic Visualization
> Laboratory (EVL) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC).
> 
> - CAVE2 -  approximately 24 feet in diameter and 8 feet tall, and consists
> of 72 near-seamless passive stereo off-axis-optimized 3D LCD panels, a
> 36-node high-performance computer cluster, a 20-speaker surround audio
> system, a 10-camera optical tracking system and a 100-Gigabit/second
> connection to the outside world. CAVE2 provides users with a 320-degree
> panoramic environment for displaying information at 37 Megapixels in 3D or
> 74 Megapixels in 2D with a horizontal visual acuity of 20/20 - almost 10
> times the 3D resolution of the original CAVE.
> https://www.evl.uic.edu/entry.php?id=2016
> Here's a performance that was done with the CAVE2 last year:
> https://www.evl.uic.edu/entry.php?id=2016
> - Original CAVE - https://www.evl.uic.edu/pape/CAVE/
> 
> Tina
> ___
> You are currently subscribed to mcn-l, the listserv of the Museum Computer 
> Network (http://www.mcn.edu)
> 
> To post to this list, send messages to: mcn-l@mcn.edu
> 
> To unsubscribe or change mcn-l delivery options visit:
> http://mcn.edu/mailman/listinfo/mcn-l
> 
> The MCN-L archives can be found at:
> http://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/

___
You are currently subscribed to mcn-l, the listserv of the Museum Computer 
Network (http://www.mcn.edu)

To post to this list, send messages to: mcn-l@mcn.edu

To unsubscribe or change mcn-l delivery options visit:
http://mcn.edu/mailman/listinfo/mcn-l

The MCN-L archives can be found at:
http://www.mail-archive.com/mcn-l@mcn.edu/


[MCN-L] Embedding LCD screens in new walls?

2013-09-16 Thread Jason Jay Stevens

For that, I like cabinet doors or blended panels with hidden, magnetic latches, 
or tastefully-placed panel bolts. If the design accepts it, a floating 
panel--not going all the way to the ceiling or the floor, cleated-and-pinned, 
out in front of the wall is pretty easy to implement, too.

: j




Jason Jay Stevens
Flutter  Wow Museum Projects

P. O. Box 21576
Detroit, MI 48221

jason at flutterwow.com
210.364.6305
 
 On Sep 16, 2013, at 11:40 AM, George Scharoun GScharoun at mfa.org wrote:
 
 Has anyone had experience burying an LCD display in a wall, so as to hide 
 the frame and/or crop the image to a desired aspect ratio? Our curators and 
 designers (not responsible for the well-being of the equipment) are keen on 
 the idea, as it will no doubt give the exhibition a nice clean look. However 
 as the technical producer, I feel very uncomfortable putting any piece of 
 equipment someplace I can't get to it, i.e. behind taped and painted seams.  
 Even if you were guaranteed the equipment would have adequate ventilation, 
 would you agree to install equipment without maintenance access?
 
 The question I'm often asked is, will you need to get to it? To which I 
 respond, I shouldn't, but I might. It's true, but it feels like a flimsy 
 answer, so I'm curious to know how others have handled this situation, or 
 how you would handle it.
 
 Thanks so much,
 George
 
 ??
 
 GEORGE SCHAROUN
 Technical Producer, Gallery Media
 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
 gscharoun at mfa.org | 617-369-3512
 http://www.mfa.org
 
 ___
 You are currently subscribed to mcn-l, the listserv of the Museum Computer 
 Network (http://www.mcn.edu)
 
 To post to this list, send messages to: mcn-l at mcn.edu
 
 To unsubscribe or change mcn-l delivery options visit:
 http://mcn.edu/mailman/listinfo/mcn-l
 
 The MCN-L archives can be found at:
 http://mcn.edu/pipermail/mcn-l/
 
 ___
 You are currently subscribed to mcn-l, the listserv of the Museum Computer 
 Network (http://www.mcn.edu)
 
 To post to this list, send messages to: mcn-l at mcn.edu
 
 To unsubscribe or change mcn-l delivery options visit:
 http://mcn.edu/mailman/listinfo/mcn-l
 
 The MCN-L archives can be found at:
 http://mcn.edu/pipermail/mcn-l/