[nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road, Bear Mountain

2018-05-24 Thread Peter Reisfeld
Today I made my annual pilgimmage to Doodletown Road.  By the time I had 
climbed up Gray’s hill I had most of my target birds, with singing ceruleans, 
yellow-throated vireos, indigo buntings, a yellow billed cuckoo, a singing 
Louisiana waterthrush,  a blue winged warbler, a worm-eating warbler, and 
hooded in the background.  But when I ran into a bunch of Queens and Long 
Island birding buddies leaving the First June cemetery things really kicked up 
a notch. 

After a stop at the other June cemetery, we headed up Doodletown road to see if 
the Kentucky warbler was in it’s usual spot.  On the way Eric Miller found a 
female Cape may warbler in a thin, bittersweet-covered tree.  Then we saw an 
olive-sided flycatcher in a bare tree a bit further up the road.  I had to take 
a personal call and missed the pileated in the woods past the stream.  When I 
headed up the hill to see if I could catch up with it, the I got the surprise 
of the day.  Eric called out  that he has found a golden winged warbler in a 
meadow south of the road.  It was a first at Doodletown for pretty much 
everyone there.  

We missed the Kentucky, but got scattering of other birds including multiple 
worm-eatings, ceruleans, cuckoos, a few more warblers found by Eric including 
magnolia, BT green, and canada, another olive sided flycatcher, and even a 
timber rattlesnake along Pleasant Valley road.  When we were all done I had 
seen or heard 16 species of warbler for a great day of birding. 
Wishing you good birding days as well, 

Peter





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[nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road, Bear Mtn State Park - 9.4.16

2016-09-05 Thread Amy Simmons
Date:  Sunday, Sept. 4, 2016
Location:  Doodletown Rd., Bear Mountain, NY
Observers:  Amy Simmons, Claire Borrelli and Kym Michaud

Knowing that the beach was going to be a bit too windy for our taste, we 
decided to instead have a walk and picnic at Doodletown Road in Bear Mountain 
State Park on Sunday.  While we didn't see all that many birds, the weather 
couldn't have been more gorgeous and what we DID see was a real treat:  a 
three-foot long yellow-phase Timber Rattlesnake basking in the sun, and a 
mother Black Bear with two cubs on the trail!

I've seen a number of harmless snakes at Bear Mountain over the years, but this 
was my first rattlesnake there.  We were walking around one of the cemeteries 
and as we were exiting to go back to the main trail, one of us thought she'd 
have a seat on a log and rest for a moment.  As she was about to sit down, her 
eye caught a rather large yellow and umber snake, loosely coiled,  basking in 
the sun at the end of the log -- just below where she was about to sit!  
Needless to say, she (and all of us) slowly backed away.  It started to lightly 
shake its rattle but stopped once we'd backed-up quite a bit.  The snake was 
absolutely gorgeous and while we were all slightly unnerved at how we just 
hadn't noticed it until it was almost too late, seeing it was a real thrill.  
Thinking this was probably the highlight of our day, we headed back down the 
trail to make our way back to the car.  On the way, we heard a loud tapping 
noise and were able to spot a Pileated Woodpecker foraging for bugs high-up in 
one of the trees.  Once again, nature surprised us as Claire suddenly, calmly 
and quietly stated, "There are three bears coming up the trail in front of us." 
 Sure enough, a large Black Bear and two cubs were ambling up the trail toward 
us.  When we all turned to look, the mother and one of the cubs disappeared 
into the bushes, but the other cub was quite curious and stood and stared at us 
for quite a while.  We waited and when he didn't seem to be going anywhere, we 
decided to start clapping and yelling loudly, since he was blocking our way 
back to the car.  This did the trick and he scampered after his mother.  Even 
so, we decided to make a LOT of noise for the next couple of hundred yards.

So, even without lots of birds, it was a pretty great day.  Below is a list of 
the birds we did manage to see:

4 Black Vulture
1 Turkey Vulture
1 Red-tailed Hawk
3 Ruby-throated Hummingbird
1 Belted Kingfisher
3 Red-bellied Woodpecker
1 Northern Flicker
3 Pileated Woodpecker
1 Red-eyed Vireo
1 Blue Jay
2 American Crow
4 Tufted Titmouse
1 White-breasted Nuthatch
1 House Wren
1 Hermit Thrush
15 American Robin
4 Gray Catbird
1 Black-and-white Warbler
5 American Redstart
16 Chipping Sparrow
25 Common Grackle
3 American Goldfinch

Amy Simmons


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[nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road 5/12

2016-05-12 Thread Peter Reisfeld
I made my annual pilgrimage to Doodletown Road today in the pleasant company of 
Bob and Collen Veltri.  We saw good numbers of ceruleans, including females on 
nest.  Hoodeds were everywhere, often singing alternate songs, one of which was 
a spitting image of a yellow throated warbler. When we finally saw the bird who 
was singing, it was the first time in my life I was disappointed to see a 
hooded warbler.  

Our main target , however, was the Kentucky. We were encouraged when we ran 
into Tom Burke and Gail Benson at the intersection of Doodletown and Pleasant 
Valley road who had just seen the bird further up Doodletown.  The bird had 
been seen just past the bridge as well as further up the hill, but we struck 
out at both sites.  We returned after birding Pleasant Valley to reports that 
the bird was again singing just past the bridge. We hurried up the road only to 
run into a road block.  There was a group of hikers that decided to do their 
business right where the bird was singing, and their mates asked us to wait to 
respect their privacy. It seemed like forever, but the bird was still singing 
when we were finally allowed entry.  That’s when one of the hikers blew her 
whistle to alert all their members they were leaving.  With my hearing aids 
turned all the way up, it almost pierced my ear drums. Needless to say, after 
that the bird was gone. 

We licked our wounds and headed further up the hill to the alternate location.  
But before long we were rewarded with ground level views, as the Kentucky was 
attracted by a termite hatch in a fallen log.

Here’s a link to videos of the Kentucky, a male and female cerulean on nest, 
and a female cerulean building her nest. 

https://flic.kr/s/aHskA1GEim

Just another reminder for those thinking of coming up on Sunday, that  Rt 9 
will be closed on May 15 until 1PM for to a bicycle race. 

Happy spring birding!

Peter

https://flic.kr/s/aHskA1GEim
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[nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road

2014-05-26 Thread Peter Reisfeld
Despite my abysmal record of success at finding target birds this year, I 
visited Doodletown Road today hoping to get the Cerulean and Kentucky warblers 
that had eluded me thus far.   I arrived early, only to be swarmed with 
mosquitos and flies.  There was plenty of birdsong, but I had to keep moving,  
not the ideal strategy for finding treetop ceruleans, or ventriloquistic 
hoodeds.  I spend a miserable hour or two without seeing anything notable, save 
a yellow throated vireo.  Hearing a Kentucky singing on Pleasant Valley Road 
was a highlight, but the bird seemed to be deep in the woods, and I was unable 
to locate it. 

I pondered cutting my losses and leaving, but as the morning wore on and 
birders and hikers filled the park, the insects surprisingly abated.  (Perhaps 
they'd found targets other than me).  And while there was less birdsong, I was 
finally able to spot some birds.  First it was a singing blue-winged warbler on 
Doodletown road. Then I headed back for a second try at the Kentucky, and this 
time I scored.  As I sat on a rock watching it sing on a bare twig, I excitedly 
announced my finding  to  passing group.  I know, I can hear him, said the 
first  birder as he walked by without slowing, obviously less thrilled than me. 

After getting a few people on the bird, it flew, and I continued up the road 
finding a nice clearing where I sat down and had a snack.  I heard scarlet 
tanager, RB grosbeak, hooded warbler and indigo bunting singing, and was able 
to spot the first three.  As I munched, I got a quick glance at a grayish 
warbler-type bird with a wing bars  that was flitting around. I thought/hoped 
female cerulean, and then it appeared again, giving me a better look.  It was 
indeed a female cerulean, busy collecting nesting material.  I watched her 
bring it back to the nest, and then go out for several more forays. 

Well satisfied, I started heading out, but ran into Karlo and Allison Mirth, 
and I brought them back to see see the nest, giving me the additional pleasure 
of sharing.  I headed out again, and just before leaving the park  I heard a 
buzzy call up the steps at the very first historic house site near the 
beginning of the trail.  Low and behold, I was greeted by a singing male 
cerulean, not very high, and in good light.   Boy was I glad I didn't leave 
early. 

I uploaded a couple of short, slightly shaky, imperfectly exposed videos of the 
Kentucky and the Cerulean nest onto my Flicker site:

https://www.flickr.com/photos/50403904@N03/


Happy late spring birding!

Peter
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[nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road

2014-05-18 Thread Carney, Martin
I birded Doodletown Road yesterday from approximately 8:30 to 1:30.  It was
a delightful day and the birds did not disappoint.  My highlights included
10 warblers: Canada (2), Cerulean (4), Blue-winged, Hooded, Redstarts,
Magnolias, Yellow, Black-throated Blue, and the best look I've ever had at
a Tennessee, down low, bathing in a little stream.  I also encountered the
elusive (for me) Bay-breasted, which was a delight.  Conversations with
other birders revealed there were Kentucky, Worm-eating, Cape May, and
Black and white warblers, as well.  A Yellow-throated Vireo, Scarlet
Tanager and a bunch of Baltimore Orioles rounded out the scoring.  What a
wonderful hobby we have!

Happy Birding
Martin Carney

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Re: [nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road

2014-05-18 Thread Robert Lewis



This great birding spot is in northern Rockland County.   41.301533, -73.986193

For those who are new to the area:  I just noticed that Google maps no longer 
shows the correct path for birding Doodletown.  If you go there and zoom in, DO 
NOT take the path labeled Ramapo-Dunderberg Trail (at least, no more than a 
quick look at the pool there).  Instead, go to Bing maps, where you find 
correctly labeled and placed Doodletown Road.  That's the trail you want to 
take from 9W.  Google maps does, however, correctly label Lemon Road.

Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY

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[nysbirds-l] Doodletown Road, Rockland County: excellent birding

2014-05-11 Thread Robert Lewis
All,

  I had an extremely good, rather brief, late afternoon trip to Doodletown 
Road, part of Bear Mountain State Park.  Excellent  migration, many birds, 
almost constant activity.   4:30 - 6:00 pm.

  The highlight was probably the adult male Cerulean that stayed below my eye 
level ten feet away in perfect light for about thirty seconds.  Amazing.


Black Vulture (2)

Red-bellied Woodpecker  
Downy Woodpecker  
Blue Jay  
White-breasted Nuthatch  
House Wren  
American Robin  
Wood Thrush


E. Kingbird
E. Wood-pewee


Blue-gray Gnatcatcher


Red-eyed Vireo
Yellow-throated Vireo

Black-and-white Warbler  
Nashville Warbler
American Redstart,  many
Northern Parula  
Magnolia Warbler,  many
Chestnut-sided Warbler  
Black-throated Blue Warbler,  pair
Yellow-rumped Warbler  
Black-throated Green Warbler  
Wilson's Warbler
Worm-eating Warbler
Cerulean, 3
Hooded Warbler

Eastern Towhee  
Swamp Sparrow  
Chipping Sparrow
Scarlet Tanager  
Northern Cardinal  
Indigo Bunting
Red-winged Blackbird  
Baltimore Oriole,  many


Bob Lewis
Sleepy Hollow NY

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