RE: [Maybe Spam] RE: [WSG] print headers/footers

2004-04-26 Thread P.H.Lauke
However, if it comes to court, the case will - in my mind anyway - have to be made 
about specific features that are or aren't discriminating, and not (just) general 
principles. As I said - and I don't think we're disagreeing here, just want to spell 
it out - you *can* design for the majority, as long as you ensure that your design 
degrades gracefully and meaningfully for the minorities. Otherwise, you just end up 
design to the lowest of the lowest common denominators, and we may as well just do 
unstyled html 2.0 or something.

P

Patrick H. Lauke
Webmaster / University of Salford
http://www.salford.ac.uk

 Original Message-
 From: Robert O'Neill [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Sent: 26 April 2004 16:16
 To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
 Subject: [Maybe Spam] RE: [WSG] print headers/footers


 It was not Barbara's features I was highlighting (please don't take that the wrong 
 way), just the fact that 
 generally designing a web site for a majority, inherently means you are 
 discriminating against a minority.
 
 Minorities rule in a court of law.
*
The discussion list for http://webstandardsgroup.org/
See http://webstandardsgroup.org/mail/guidelines.cfm
for some hints on posting to the list  getting help
*



RE: [Maybe Spam] RE: [WSG] print headers/footers

2004-04-26 Thread Robert O'Neill



Doh! article URL

http://www.computerweekly.com/articles/article.asp?liArticleID=129919liFlavourID=1






I think we will have to wait for some decent case law before 
we fully realise how this will effect web designers. A recent article in 
computer weekly 'Ignoring disabled 
web access will lead to legal action, warns DRC' illustrates that this 
might not be too far away..





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Rob O'NeillWeb Team ManagerPrescription Pricing AuthorityBridge 
House152 Pilgrim StreetNewcastle Upon TyneNE1 6SN

email: [EMAIL PROTECTED]

tel: (0191) 203 5483ext: 5483

 [EMAIL PROTECTED] 04/26/04 04:35pm 
However, if it comes to court, the case will - in my mind anyway 
- have to be made about specific features that are or aren't discriminating, and 
not (just) general principles. As I said - and I don't think we're disagreeing 
here, just want to spell it out - you *can* design for the majority, as long as 
you ensure that your design degrades gracefully and meaningfully for the 
minorities. Otherwise, you just end up design to the lowest of the lowest common 
denominators, and we may as well just do unstyled html 2.0 or 
something.PPatrick H. 
LaukeWebmaster / University of Salfordhttp://www.salford.ac.uk 
Original Message- From: Robert O'Neill [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Sent: 26 April 2004 16:16 To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] Subject: 
[Maybe Spam] RE: [WSG] print headers/footers It was not 
Barbara's features I was highlighting (please don't take that the wrong way), 
just the fact that  generally designing a web site for a majority, 
inherently means you are discriminating against a minority.  
Minorities rule in a court of 
law.*The discussion 
list for http://webstandardsgroup.org/See http://webstandardsgroup.org/mail/guidelines.cfmfor 
some hints on posting to the list  getting 
help*

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