However, if it comes to court, the case will - in my mind anyway - have to be made 
about specific features that are or aren't discriminating, and not (just) general 
principles. As I said - and I don't think we're disagreeing here, just want to spell 
it out - you *can* design for the majority, as long as you ensure that your design 
degrades gracefully and meaningfully for the minorities. Otherwise, you just end up 
design to the lowest of the lowest common denominators, and we may as well just do 
unstyled html 2.0 or something.

P
________________________________
Patrick H. Lauke
Webmaster / University of Salford
http://www.salford.ac.uk

> ----Original Message-----
> From: Robert O'Neill [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
> Sent: 26 April 2004 16:16
> To: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
> Subject: [Maybe Spam] RE: [WSG] print headers/footers


> It was not Barbara's features I was highlighting (please don't take that the wrong 
> way), just the fact that 
> generally designing a web site for a majority, inherently means you are 
> discriminating against a minority.
> 
> Minorities rule in a court of law.
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