Your lab range is correct. Severe sepsis is indicated for lactate greater than 
2.0 to less than 4.0. Lactate of 4.0 & higher=shock.

Mary Shoup
Clinical Quality Specialist
Tel: (517) 205-1358
Cell: (269) 967-0210
Fax: (517) 841-1322
mary.sh...@allegiancehealth.org<mailto:mary.sh...@allegiancehealth.org>
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From: Sepsisgroups [mailto:sepsisgroups-boun...@lists.sepsisgroups.org] On 
Behalf Of Pamela Green
Sent: Tuesday, August 08, 2017 1:30 PM
To: sepsisgroups@lists.sepsisgroups.org
Subject: Re: [Sepsis Groups] Lab times

We have been utilizing our Sepsis Protocol for the last Month and have been 
screening and intervening on several patients. There is one Level that we need 
clarification for. Our Protocol says any Lactate Level ≥2 is considered to 
indicate sepsis, but our lab range is Normal for 0.4- 2.0. Would like to know 
how everyone is using this? Thanks Pam

From: Sepsisgroups [mailto:sepsisgroups-boun...@lists.sepsisgroups.org] On 
Behalf Of Belfi, Karen
Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2017 12:27 PM
To: 
sepsisgroups@lists.sepsisgroups.org<mailto:sepsisgroups@lists.sepsisgroups.org>
Subject: [Sepsis Groups] Lab times

Hi, we are confused about something here.
On our lab report in our EMR, it lists a time. It's the draw time, not report 
time, though it doesn't say draw time. We just know it is.
Can we use that for severe sepsis criteria since it doesn't specify draw time?
Thank you.

Karen Belfi, RN, MSN
Quality Outcomes Coordinator
Lankenau Medical Center
(484)476-8092

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