... that class of paternalistic
semi-intellectual experts with some Ivy league, Oxford-Cambridge, or
similar label-driven education who are telling the rest of us 1) what to do, 2) what to eat, 3) how to speak, 4) how to thinkā€¦ and 5) who to vote
for.


If the alternative is to live among people who not only know how, but actively prefer, to mind their own business[0]; I could understand the quoted part of this rant better.

My experience in my native anglophone country[1] is that semi- intellectual experts at least attempt to justify their advice; by examining their assumptions and arguments, one can decide for oneself whether to ignore, follow, or even do the opposite. However, the alternative is a class of anti-intellectuals who make very little attempt (at best, on ahistorical "traditional" grounds; at worst, by threat of unpleasantry or violence) to advance valid arguments for why *they* are telling the rest of us 1) what to do, 2) what to eat, 3) how to speak, 4) how to think... and 5) who to vote for[2].

Given that choice, others obviously have different preferences, but I prefer getting my unsolicited advice from the boffins.

-Dave

[0] the flag is not the only big plus of CH.
[1] in which anti-intellectual demagoguery has a long history of political (how many practical?) successes. I would also interested in hearing abut the Indian experience by way of contrast.
[2] for whom to vote?


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