This is not to circumvent the limits. I will open up another account
for the second connection.

On Oct 12, 8:09 pm, John Kalucki <jkalu...@gmail.com> wrote:
> You should have only one, perhaps two, sockets open to the Streaming
> API at any given time -- at most one on /1/statuses/filter and at most
> one on /1/statuses/sample. Opening multiple connections to circumvent
> limits is against the TOS. Also, opening more than one connection with
> the same account is not allowed and your older connection may be
> disconnected. Create a second account for the second connection.
>
> -John Kalucki
> http;//twitter.com/jkalucki
> Services, Twitter Inc
>
> On Oct 12, 7:27 pm, EastSideDev <eastside...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > No, I am using the same username and password. This used to work
> > (limited success), but it is not working now.
>
> > On Oct 12, 6:10 pm, Chad Etzel <c...@twitter.com> wrote:
>
> > > Are you using separate username/password combos to connect each socket?
> > > -Chad
>
> > > On Mon, Oct 12, 2009 at 7:26 PM, EastSideDev <eastside...@gmail.com> 
> > > wrote:
>
> > > > I have been using 3-4 scripts, to collect data, using the streaming
> > > > APIs. Each script opens up a socket and keeps it open, unless it's
> > > > closed by twitter (maintenance, problems, etc.). Each script checks
> > > > for a pulse, and re-opens the socket when the Twitter service is back
> > > > in business.
>
> > > > This was working for a while, but now I can only get one socket opened
> > > > at a time. When I start the next script, the previous one disconnects.
>
> > > > I am using fsockopen: fsockopen("stream.twitter.com", 80,  &$err_no, &
> > > > $err_msg, 30)
>
> > > > The scripts run on a Linux system. fsockopen implicitly binds to 0
> > > > locally, so my system should be assigning a different local ports for
> > > > each script. Why can't I keep more than one socket open at the same
> > > > time?

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