You can get pretty sophisticated and have lots of heuristics to guess
what the user actually meant. For example, a period followed by a
space and a word that starts with uppercase almost certainly means
that the period was the end of a sentence and not part of the url.
Twitter probably should do this, as it's quite conservative.

Diego

On Dec 17, 11:10 am, Ken Dobruskin <k...@cimas.ch> wrote:
> True, but Yahoo! Mail and others do get it right.
> It's been a few years I no longer worry sending an email with a URL at the 
> end of a sentence. I wonder how they do it.
>
>
>
> > Date: Thu, 17 Dec 2009 05:48:31 -0800
> > Subject: [twitter-dev] Re: URLification
> > From: dba...@gmail.com
> > To: twitter-development-talk@googlegroups.com
>
> > Periods and parentheses are valid url characters. Assuming that an
> > adjacent period or closing parenthesis is not part of the url is a
> > gamble. The most sensible urlification includes all valid characters
> > until it finds one that clearly delimits the url such as a space.
>
> >http://www.ietf.org/rfc/rfc1738.txt
>
> > On Dec 17, 7:13 am, Ken Dobruskin <k...@cimas.ch> wrote:
> > > When adding a URL surrounded by parentheses or followed by a period, 
> > > these marks are included in the resulting link. Is a trailing whitespace 
> > > the only workaround? It's ugly and wastes a character.
>
> > > _________________________________________________________________
> > > Windows Live Hotmail: Your friends can get your Facebook updates, right 
> > > from 
> > > Hotmail®.http://www.microsoft.com/middleeast/windows/windowslive/see-it-in-act...
>
> _________________________________________________________________
> Windows Live: Friends get your Flickr, Yelp, and Digg updates when they 
> e-mail 
> you.http://www.microsoft.com/middleeast/windows/windowslive/see-it-in-act...

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