Chrome has it too.

On Sun, May 16, 2010 at 03:20, nischalshetty <nischalshett...@gmail.com>wrote:

> Isn't console.log() specific to firebug? #JustSaying :)
>
> On May 16, 4:43 am, Larry <la...@topsy.com> wrote:
> > Firefox 3.X is a supported browser for @anywhere and my example is
> > properly configured, yet it triggered when it wasn't supposed to. This
> > highlights my point of why alert() not a good choice for notification
> > of incorrect installations. Instead maybe it should use throw(). That
> > would be more useful to a developer and not intrusive to a user.
> >
> > Larry
> >
> > On May 15, 3:26 pm, Abraham Williams <4bra...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >
> >
> > > I agree that @Anywhere should degrade gracefully when configured
> properly on
> > > unsupported platforms and not prompt incorrect alert()s. But I do think
> > > alert()s are probably the best way to notify developers of incorrect
> > > installations.
> >
> > > Abraham
> >
> > > On Sat, May 15, 2010 at 11:55, Larry <la...@topsy.com> wrote:
> > > > I can reliably reproduce this with Firefox 3.0.8 at the following
> url:
> > > >http://cornsyrup.org/~larry/anywhere/index.html
> >
> > > > Error console is reporting "S.get is not a function"
> >
> > > > Larry
> >
> > > > On May 15, 11:31 am, Larry <la...@topsy.com> wrote:
> > > > > Our site has been running @anywhere for over a week now without
> error.
> > > > > Yesterday my coworker was getting the alert(). He is running an
> older
> > > > > version of Firefox (3.0.8) on Ubuntu, so there might be another
> cause
> > > > > other than missing clientID or version?
> >
> > > > > I still believe alert() is intrusive, especially for this case
> where
> > > > > it works fine except for this edge case. Instead of users
> complaining
> > > > > about broken hovercards, they are complaining about alert dialogs.
> >
> > > > > Larry
> >
> > > > > On May 14, 8:38 pm, Abraham Williams <4bra...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > > > > > Both of which are issues that will pretty much stop @Anywhere
> from
> > > > working
> > > > > > and need to be noticed as soon as possible at installation.
> Hiding them
> > > > in
> > > > > > console.log will make it more likely that @Anywhere will be
> installe
> > > > > > improperly and the admins will only find out when users complain.
> >
> > > > > > Abraham
> >
> > > > > > On Fri, May 14, 2010 at 15:57, Larry <la...@topsy.com> wrote:
> > > > > > > I just came across a coworker's browser that triggered an
> alert()
> > > > call
> > > > > > > from anywhere.js. While okay for development, the use of
> alert() is
> > > > > > > not friendly for production websites. Could these be converted
> > > > > > > console.log() or some other benign mechanism?
> >
> > > > > > > Grepping through anywhere.js I found two instances of alert():
> >
> > > > > > > alert("To set up @anywhere, please provide a client ID");
> >
> > > > > > > alert("No version matching "+Z);
> >
> > > > > > > Cheers
> > > > > > > Larry
> >
> > > > > > --
> > > > > > Abraham Williams | Developer for hire |http://abrah.am
> > > > > > @abraham |http://projects.abrah.am|http://blog.abrah.am
> > > > > > This email is: [ ] shareable [x] ask first [ ] private.
> >
> > > --
> > > Abraham Williams | Developer for hire |http://abrah.am
> > > @abraham |http://projects.abrah.am|http://blog.abrah.am
> > > This email is: [ ] shareable [x] ask first [ ] private.
>



-- 
Abraham Williams | Developer for hire | http://abrah.am
@abraham | http://projects.abrah.am | http://blog.abrah.am
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