Hi Tim,

We looked into your request but unfortunately cannot expedite resolving it
right now. In this case, the account used to post the tweets was suspended
-- not your application. While there's obviously a good deal of overlap
between API policy/enforcement and account policy/enforcement, this kind of
suspension falls squarely in the "account policy" camp. The support team's
response time is actually quite good right now, and I imagine you'll be
hearing back from them soon.

Thanks for the keen understanding on what went wrong here -- since there are
obviously many developers who might find themselves facing the same scenario
at some point, can you share a bit on what actions you'll take to avoid this
in the future?

Thanks!
Taylor

On Mon, Oct 4, 2010 at 1:48 PM, Tim Bull <tim.b...@binaryplex.com> wrote:

> Our application (twitter.com/distlr) has had it's account suspended
> and I need this reviewed.  I (think I) understand why it was
> suspended, which was stupidity on my part rather than anything
> malicious or bad on the part of the application itself.
>
> We follow a very lean start-up approach:
>
> * We had the idea for Distlr and immediately interviewed people and
> asked them if they'd use it.
> * When they said Yes, we prototyped it with @anywhere and put it in
> front of them, then surveyed them and asked if they'd use it.
> * When they said yes, we developed a very alpha version with full
> OAuth integration, incorporating their feedback and put it front of a
> bigger audience.  Around 60 people registered and 400 used it
> anonymously.
>
> Unsurprisingly if you follow the thread here, I then went to survey
> these 60 registered users - I created a Google Form and then (being
> very lean and not trying over engineering things) started sending the
> messages from the Distlr account to each of the registered users.
>
> "@usera @userb @etc Thanks for using Distlr. Would love your feedback
> via this short survey: http://bit.ly/distlrsurvey";
>
> After several of these, the Distlr account was suspended.
>
> Immediately when this happened, I've slapped my forehead with the
> biggest "Doh!" you've heard.  As I've explained in the ticket, this is
> more user stupidity on my part rather than anything malicious the
> application itself is doing.
>
> It's holding us up because while the ticket is Open, I'm loath to move
> the app to a new account as it may look like we are trying to be
> underhanded, which we absolutely aren't.  Unless Twitter knows
> differently, I really don't think the app itself is misbehaving, I
> think it's just these survey links which have caused the concern.
>
> How long are these support tickets taking to be reviewed (it's been
> open over 17 hours now) and is it possible that someone from the
> Twitter dev support team can help out with getting it reviewed sooner
> please?  If we have to wait, we have to wait, but we'd love to
> progress forwards with the feedback we did get from the few people
> that filled out the survey before the account got suspended.
>
> The ticket is http://support.twitter.com/tickets/1256917
>
> Thanks!
>
> Tim Bull
>
> --
> Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
> API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
> Issues/Enhancements Tracker:
> http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
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>

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