If you want to display a feed of tweets matching a search term, I would use
the Twitter javascript widgets. Since the requests are client side, you
don't have to worry about rate limiting, and you can style the widget as you
please. Fetching tweets, storing them in a database, and serving them is
overkill.

If you would like to see an example, I can set up a page.

Regarding spam, anytime you are displaying tweets on your site, you are
doing something positive for Twitter. Spam is usually an issue when you are
broadcasting into twitter vs pulling information out.

On Wed, Feb 23, 2011 at 2:55 AM, Richard <navin....@gmail.com> wrote:

> Peter Denton,
>
> I have a corporate website and I would like to show Twitter feeds of
> my selected keywords (Theme Based). For that I would like to use API
> which get me the feeds directly..without creating any Twitter account,
> just like anonymous user..my question is, will Twitter consider it as
> SPAM..
>
> Or Shall I follow
>
> 1. Get the feed or /statuses/user_timeline without authentication at a
> rate up to 150 times per hour and store the tweets in a database. Then
> serve tweets to your web page from the database.
>
> Thanks for any help on this.
>
>
> On Jan 12, 9:15 am, Peter Denton <petermden...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > also, check out Twitter Widgets. You can pull in tweets based on search,
> > profile, or list-- so you might be able to use that.
> >
> > Since the request is client side, rate limiting is not going to be as big
> of
> > an issue. You could also completely customize the UI if needed, both
> through
> > the form Twitter provides to generate the UI as well as with plain old
> css.
> >
> > http://twitter.com/about/resources/widgets
> >
> > If you need any help, I would be happy to help you off the list.
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 8:08 PM, Adam Green <140...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > You can use the /statuses/user_timeline API call instead of the feed if
> you
> > > want. This doesn't require authentication, so there is no need to
> create an
> > > app, if you use this call:
> > >http://dev.twitter.com/doc/get/statuses/user_timeline
> >
> > > But  no matter how you get the data, rate limiting will still be the
> same.
> > > There are three ways to address rate limiting:
> > > 1. Get the feed or /statuses/user_timeline without authentication at a
> rate
> > > up to 150 times per hour and store the tweets in a database. Then serve
> > > tweets to your web page from the database.
> > > 2. Create an app that uses OAuth to get the feed or
> /statuses/user_timeline
> > > at a rate up to 350 times per hour. Store and serve from DB as in 1.
> > > 3. Use the Streaming API to follow the user account. This uses Basic
> Auth,
> > > so no app is needed. Get the data, store and serve from DB. The
> streaming
> > > API has the advantage of delivering the data in real time with no rate
> > > limiting.
> >
> > > The point here is that each page load should not call Twitter for data.
> It
> > > should call for your copy of the data.
> >
> > > If you decide to use 2, you do need an app to do OAuth. From my
> experience,
> > > the app registration page needs a properly formatted URL, not a valid
> URL
> > > that you own. This means anything that follows the format of
> > >http://domain.comwill work. You can even usehttp://twitter.com.
> > > --
> > > Adam Green
> > > Twitter API Consultant and Trainer
> > >http://140dev.com
> > > @140dev
> >
> > > On Tue, Jan 11, 2011 at 7:43 PM, TehOne <ele...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > >> I have a corporate website/portal that I want to pull in tweets to,
> > >> but i'm getting a rate limit using the http feed. So I need to explore
> > >> other options. Do I need to use an authenticated method to get the
> > >> tweets?
> >
> > >> Do I really have to register an application to do this, even though
> > >> it's not really an application and my users will never be entering or
> > >> changing the twitter account info. It will be a single twitter account
> > >> that I will be pulling the feed from.
> >
> > >> Also, my corporate site doesn't have a public address, and registering
> > >> an application through twitter appears to require a public url. So how
> > >> can I get around this? Do I have to create a "fake" application with a
> > >> public url, just to generate my keys?
> >
> > >> Thanks for any help on this.
> >
> > >> --
> > >> Twitter developer documentation and resources:
> http://dev.twitter.com/doc
> > >> API updates via Twitter:http://twitter.com/twitterapi
> > >> Issues/Enhancements Tracker:
> > >>http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
> > >> Change your membership to this group:
> > >>http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk
> >
> > >  --
> > > Twitter developer documentation and resources:
> http://dev.twitter.com/doc
> > > API updates via Twitter:http://twitter.com/twitterapi
> > > Issues/Enhancements Tracker:
> > >http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
> > > Change your membership to this group:
> > >http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk
> >
> > --
> > Peter Denton
> > Co-Founder, Product Marketingwww.mombo.com
> > cell: (206) 427-3866
> > twitter @Mombo_movies
> > twitter - personal: @petermdenton
>
> --
> Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
> API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
> Issues/Enhancements Tracker:
> http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
> Change your membership to this group:
> http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk
>

-- 
Twitter developer documentation and resources: http://dev.twitter.com/doc
API updates via Twitter: http://twitter.com/twitterapi
Issues/Enhancements Tracker: http://code.google.com/p/twitter-api/issues/list
Change your membership to this group: 
http://groups.google.com/group/twitter-development-talk

Reply via email to