On 23/2/18 9:04 am, Joe Zeff wrote:
On 02/22/2018 01:27 PM, Stephen Morris wrote:
 From the responses I am getting it seems that the meaning of 'taints the kernel' has morphed into something else?


Here's my understanding of it from when I had nVidia graphics. Let's say that you have a kerneloops, but haven't rebooted.  Your kernel is considered to be tainted by that because anybody trying to recreate a later kernel issue can't properly know what state the kernel was in.  If you have any binary modules loaded that are closed source, your kernel is considered tainted because there's no way to troubleshoot that module or find out if it's involved. (My personal opinion is that in this case somebody should try to recreate the issue with an untainted kernel to see if that module's involved, but I guess that's too much bother.)

I'm not sure at the moment whether the nvidia module being used is the binary one or the one I compiled from source, but I also compile my wifi driver from source and the 6 mouse modules are also compiled from source, and I am trying to understand why the taint messages, especially the out-of-tree module message, flip-flop between nvidia and my wifi driver, but they have never been produced by the mouse drivers, even though all 3 are compiled through dkms and all the compiled modules are located in the same directory. The dkms.conf file for the mouse driver is different from the file for the wifi driver, but the dkms.conf files for the wifi and nvidia drivers are the same.


regards,

Steve


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