In reply to  bobcook39...@hotmail.com's message of Mon, 23 Apr 2018 14:44:53
+0000:
Hi,




>Jones—
>
>IT’S JUST HAND WAVING.
>
>Fission reactions with U and the like are  nasty—hard to manage—processes.  
>The high energy gammas and the variety of fission products are the problem not 
>to mention the possibility of runaway reactions.   There are NO silk purses 
>that will come out of those sows ears!
>
>I DO NOT CONSIDER THERE IS ANY FUTURE IN HYBRED FISSION USING ANYTHING HEAVIER 
>THAN NI OR FE.

Actually, fission of elements not much heavier than Ni/Fe could be interesting
because the daughter isotopes may well be stable. I say this because the
instability of the Uranium fission daughter products is primarily due to the
large number of excess neutrons. For elements not much heavier than Ni/Fe OTOH,
there are far fewer excess neutrons, so any resulting fission products are
consequently less likely to be unstable.
The down side is that such elements are also much more difficult to fission,
i.e. the "hump" that has to be overcome is higher.

Prompt gammas are not really a problem, as they can be shielded, more or a
concern are gammas resulting from the daughter isotopes as they decay. If there
are far fewer (or no) radioisotopes among the daughter products then this also
becomes less of a (or no) problem.
[snip]
Regards,


Robin van Spaandonk

local asymmetry = temporary success

Reply via email to