Hi Chris,

Depending on how far down the rabbit hole you're going to go. There seem to be 
supposedly a lot of problems with the Home Pod setup process (not even in a 
enterprise network) - 
https://www.macrumors.com/2018/02/14/homepod-setup-troubleshooting/


I wanted to bring that point up so you don't rule out "an issue with the 
specific Home Pod itself" as I recently made the same error with a Google Home 
Mini (first and only ticket I received) - we tested the Google Home last year - 
and worked perfectly. We're an Aruba Deployment that leverages AirGroup 
(mDNS/SSPD proxy) and ClearPass (Radius/Device Registration) for 
suppressing/controlling the discovery protocols so only Billy will discover 
Billy's Chromecast for example.

  *   Google Home (Tall Version) works with AirGroup - the service sees the 
mDNS responses and classifies it as a server.
  *   Google Home Mini does not work with AirGroup - the service sees the 
packets and discards them repeatedly (it should classify the device as either a 
Server, User, or both)
  *   I performed a packet-capture to compare the Tall vs Mini - they're both 
identical (minus mac address and ip-address)
     *   Mini works in a home network with mDNS.
     *   Mini works in a lab when I allow mDNS to run rampant (with AirGroup 
Disabled)
  *   I made the error in thinking the issue was between the Tall and Small 
version - it wasn't:
     *   I go and buy another Google Home Mini - plug it in - and AirGroup 
classifies it as an Server - works perfectly. The only difference - this one 
was manufactured a month after the other one. Logically, this would point to a 
defective device - but still mDNS works in other scenarios. I'm sure there's 
something else going on.
     *   Software/Firmware is identical - multiple factory resets

I have a TAC case opened with Aruba - after working with them for a couple days 
- they've escalated to their development team as it's definitely the controller 
that's failing to classify this device as a Server - just don't understand yet 
why

  1.  If you can and have the capability - can you find other "Home Pods" on 
your network via device-registration or classification (Clearpass as that 
fingerprinting)
  2.  You reminded me of my situation while I helped the student - my success 
with setting up a Home Mini with iOS was much lower than Android.
     *   Android (Wi-Fi Direct) - After telling the Home Mini to connect to the 
desired SSID - my phone would try and move over - fail...but the Home Mini 
would maintain it's connection to the SSID - at which point I'd move back to 
our dot1x network and allow AirGroup to work it's magic.
     *   iOS Bluetooth (Preferred) or (Wi-Fi Direct) - Each time I ran the Home 
Mini - after telling the Home Mini to connect to the desired SSID - my phone 
would try and move over - fail - the Home Mini would eventually "give 
up/disconnect" from the SSID. I think what was happening - device would move 
over - Home Setup App would timeout - I'd run the app again (it would use 
Bluetooth) - and redo the SSID config. My theory is if I were to forgo the 
Bluetooth and use just Wi-Fi Direct - I should get the same end-success I had 
with Android.


Other Note - I had a small chuckle while at the local Wal-Mart asking for a 
Google Home Mini - the employee commented (wait let me get you one that hasn't 
been opened) - there was an entire row of them. My thoughts - either people 
didn't like them....or with this being a university town...a bunch of students 
bought them, couldn't get them working...and returned them.


Christopher Johnson
Wireless Network Engineer
AT Infrastructure Operations & Networking (ION)
Illinois State University
(309) 438-8444
Stay connected with ISU IT news and tips with @ISU IT Help on 
Facebook<https://www.facebook.com/ISUITHelp/> and 
Twitter<https://twitter.com/ISUITHelp>



________________________________
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv 
<WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU> on behalf of Michael Dickson 
<mdick...@nic.umass.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, February 14, 2018 3:20 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Home Pod

Hi Chris,

That would be a problem for us as well. We require dot1x devices to connect to 
eduroam. Consumer IoT devices are supported on our PSK SSID.

Amazon Echos are still fairly useful as a connected IP device even if it can't 
discover the user's other Home automation devices (Alexa App smartphone 
communicates to the Echo via IP through the AWS cloud). Is the Home Pod 
similar? Or is it basically useless unless it can bathe in mDNS?

Mike

Michael Dickson
Network Engineer
Information Technology
University of Massachusetts Amherst
413-545-9639
michael.dick...@umass.edu
PGP: 0x16777D39

On Feb 12, 2018, at 3:47 PM, Chris Adams (IT) <chris.ad...@ung.edu> wrote:

> We had our first ticket come in today requesting connectivity assistance in a 
> dorm for Home Pod. According to the info provided to me, it sounds like the 
> device doesn't play well if the source device and the pod are not on the same 
> SSID and the home pod doesn't appear to support 802.1x. For example, if you 
> want to have a iPhone on a dot1x SSID and the Home Pod on a PSK SSID, even if 
> they are in the same VLAN, the set up will fail. This is causing some issues 
> as we only provide PSKs for media/non-dot1x devices and require students with 
> dot1x devices to use their credentials.
>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Chris Adams, CISSP
>
> Assistant CIO, Network & Telecom
> Division of Information Technology
> University of North Georgia
> E-Mail: chris.ad...@ung.edu | Office: (706) 867-2891
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv 
> [mailto:WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU] On Behalf Of Michael Dickson
> Sent: Monday, February 12, 2018 3:40 PM
> To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
> Subject: [WIRELESS-LAN] Apple Home Pod
>
> Hi all,
>
> Wondering if anyone has had time in front of the new Apple Home Pod. 
> According to the Apple support site "HomePod doesn't support public or 
> subscription networks with sign-in requirements or enterprise-style 
> deployments." This is not terribly surprising. What I'm really wondering is 
> how useful is this device in an enterprise environment where L2 protocols are 
> not allowed?
>
> The Amazon Echo family of products has 8 out of 9 feature categories 
> supported by L3-only connectivity (only home automation is prevented). Is L2 
> protocol discovery totally necessary for Apple Home Pod?
>
> Thanks in advance,
> Mike
>
> Michael Dickson
> Network Engineer
> Information Technology
> University of Massachusetts Amherst
> 413-545-9639
> michael.dick...@umass.edu
> PGP: 0x16777D39
>
>
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> Group discussion list can be found at http://www.educause.edu/discuss.
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