Any confirmation on this?  A customer router plugged in with LAN to
the WAN or not getting a DHCP entry or even a DNS entry has caused
many bridges to collapse and appear as if it is noise, simply because
the bridges are all echoing the massive broadcast traffic.

Lonnie

On 5/8/06, Lonnie Nunweiler <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
I suspect your system is bridged.  Can you confirm that?

Lonnie

On 5/8/06, David E. Smith <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> Okay, Scriv and I are stumped on this one.
>
> Over the last couple of weeks, we've started seeing some very odd
> oddness on a few of our 2.4GHz POPs. Not all, just some. Here's what
> appears to be happening:
>
> A couple times a day, usually during business hours, something somewhere
> generates a massive amount of noise. Connections which report an RF
> noise of -90 start showing noise levels of -60 (or worse in some cases),
> as reported by our StarOS access point. If it really is RF noise, it's
> very broad, as it's simultaneously hitting five or six POPs, some
> several miles away, but all at the same time.
>
> The towers are all running StarOS on Mikrotik RouterBoard hardware, with
> a mix of Orinoco and Prism cards, some with amps, some not. Some have
> sectored antennas (180 degrees), some have omnis. Between them, the
> towers cover just about the entire 2.4 spectrum (obviously, one channel
> per access point, but we're using at least channels 1, 4, 6, 8, and 11).
>
> Those towers are basically identical to several other towers that aren't
> affected.
>
> The other really really weird part is the crazy latency. Pings to the
> APs themselves are reliable, and our backhaul links (5.3 and 5.8 GHz)
> don't seem to be affected. And pings to our end-customers don't seem to
> get lost, they just take their sweet time getting there. While "the
> event" is happening, I've seen pings that take in excess of twenty
> seconds to complete their round trip.
>
> 64 bytes from 10.232.175.130: icmp_seq=7 ttl=62 time=27239 ms
>
> (I think that's my record. In that particular test, there were no
> packets lost, they just took a very long time to get there.)
>
> I've checked or replaced just about everything I can think of in our
> network that might cause something like this, and frankly, I'm stumped.
> I don't think it's a network problem (traffic bursts or similar) because
> of the weird bursts of RF noise. But that'd have to be one helluva burst
> of noise to do what it's doing - affecting every channel across ten
> miles at once.
>
> I can go into more detail on any part of the network if you like, though
> I think all the likely-relevant details are covered here.
>
> Help!
>
> David Smith
> MVN.net
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--
Lonnie Nunweiler
Valemount Networks Corporation
http://www.star-os.com/



--
Lonnie Nunweiler
Valemount Networks Corporation
http://www.star-os.com/
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