Yes, not the energy but just the presence of a physical object.  

From: That One Guy /sarcasm 
Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 11:09 AM
To: af@afmug.com 
Subject: Re: [AFMUG] Antenna side lobes...do they move much?

would the energy of a nearby SM alter the lobe pattern from the AP antenna

On Tue, Sep 20, 2016 at 12:07 PM, Adam Moffett <dmmoff...@gmail.com> wrote:

  Good to know, thanks.

  In Canopy FSK I remember getting re-regs from people on the side of a 
sector...seemingly regardless of how hot their RSSI was.  In Wimax I sometimes 
see fluctuations of 5-10db in the same circumstance.  

  I guess I'm just reaching for explanations. 


  ------ Original Message ------
  From: "Chuck McCown" <ch...@wbmfg.com>
  To: "Animal Farm" <af@afmug.com>
  Sent: 9/20/2016 1:00:47 PM
  Subject: Re: [AFMUG] Antenna side lobes...do they move much?

    They would be rock solid if nothing is moving in the nearfield of the 
antenna.  However your particular antenna will have lobes in slightly different 
positions and magnitudes.  The plot you get is the antenna that was hand 
tweaked and tested on the range.  Production models vary a bit from antenna to 
antenna.  

    This is kind of like the pattern your headlights cast on your garage door.  
You will see bands and irregularities on the edges of the light pattern.  They 
really don’t move but are a function of how the light was sealed together.  

    From: Adam Moffett 
    Sent: Tuesday, September 20, 2016 10:57 AM
    To: Animal Farm 
    Subject: [AFMUG] Antenna side lobes...do they move much?

    My question is about the polar plot for a sector antenna where you see tiny 
lobes coming off it.  Such as in between the rear lobe and the main lobe there 
might be several tiny lobes.  I've always thought RSSI was unstable when you 
hit the sector from a weird direction like that.

    If I could see the radiation pattern in realtime would those lobes be 
stationary or would they dance around a little?  

    I'm just looking for an underlying reason for things I've seen in the 
field, and maybe a real justification to use when I tell people not to do that.





-- 

If you only see yourself as part of the team but you don't see your team as 
part of yourself you have already failed as part of the team.

Reply via email to