Hi!

I am no expert but if a junco, it should be possible to spot? I've stalked 
quite a few, to try and see if I can notice a difference between them and 
Chipping sparrows. And in my experience at least, both species tend to sit at 
the outer end of a branch when singing, often "2 o'clock", less often "12 noon" 
like you saw. I've discovered that mobilizing some patience, to scan possible 
locations around the trees in the direction of the sound, especially outer ends 
of branches midway up, one can often find the singing bird at last. It can be 
maddening because they tend to be in "visible yet hard-to-spot" locations and 
I'll often say, how come I did not see if before. I guess to see it one has to 
enter that special yoga trance state of bird watching which is hard to achieve. 

My 5 cents! 

If it's a junco it's an unusual voice for it! 
Magnus Fiskesjö
n...@cornell.edu
________________________________________
From: bounce-123668894-84019...@list.cornell.edu 
[bounce-123668894-84019...@list.cornell.edu] on behalf of Ken Haas 
[waxw...@htva.net]
Sent: Saturday, June 8, 2019 5:48 PM
To: Barbara Bauer Sadovnic
Cc: CAYUGABIRDS-L
Subject: Re: [cayugabirds-l] Help with bird song?

Hi Barbara,

In the newest version (V2) of the Sibley app for iPhone/iPad, under the 
Dark-eyed Junco species account, there are several recordings of songs and 
calls. But there is one, which was recorded by our own Bob Mcguire in NY, that 
sounds the closest to your bird. The second trill on the bird in his recording 
is a bit truncated from your bird's song. So, I agree with the others that a 
Dark-eyed Junco, Slate-colored, is my best guess, too.

Ken Haas



On Jun 8, 2019, at 4:49 PM, Barbara Bauer Sadovnic wrote:

Thank you all for the replies.

Asher, Sandy, Laura, and Meena suggest dark-eyed junco.  Laurie suggests 
bluegrass gnatcatcher, or one of the little flycatchers,willow or alder.  My 
one glimpse could have been a junco, but it really was just a glimpse.

The song has been very consistent all three days I heard it - a high trill, 
then a trill about a major third higher.  That’s what it does!

It’s in a smallish grove/hedgerow between two fields, with a larger grove 
acrosss the road.  It sings from a place I can’t spot, except for the one time 
I saw it, when it was singing from the top of a dead tree at the side of the 
road.  Some of the time it was in walnut trees.

On Jun 8, 2019, at 3:44 PM, Sandy Podulka 
<s...@cornell.edu<mailto:s...@cornell.edu>> wrote:

A bit puzzling. The song trill seems to have two parts?  A lower part and then 
a higher part?  It is not a typical song of any birds around here. But, perhaps 
it is an odd Junco song. Could it be a Dark-eyed Junco?  What is the habitat 
like and where is the bird singing from?  Another option might be Chipping 
Sparrow.

Sandy

At 02:14 PM 6/8/2019, you wrote:
This bird has been on Tucker Rd. in Enfield since Friday May 31, at least.  I 
only got a brief look at it, on Tuesday - small and backlit - grayish, clear 
pale breast, shortish tail.  But the song is distinctive.  It was singing again 
today, but I couldn’t see it!  What is it?

https://www.dropbox.com/s/f6ejwayrd1x8sva/Tucker%20Rd%20bird%206-4-2019.m4a?dl=0
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