Victor Duchovni <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> writes:
> Actually calculating the entropy for real-world functions and generators
> may be intractable...

It is, in fact, generally intractable.

1) Kolmogorov-Chaitin entropy is just plain intractable -- finding the
   smallest possible Turing machine to generate a sequence is not
   computable.
2) Shannon entropy requires a precise knowledge of the probability of
   all symbols, and in any real world situation that, too, is
   impossible.

Usually, the best you can do is produce (bad) bounds, and sometimes
not even that.

One thing that can be done, of course, is that you can prove, under
certain assumptions, that it would take an intractable amount of
computation to distinguish a particular PRNG from a true random
sequence with greater than 50% probability. However, this is very much
NOT the same as showing that the PRNG sequence contains an endless
stream of entropy -- in fact, the unicity distance very clearly shows
you how much "real" entropy you have, and it usually isn't
much. Merely because "too much" computation would be needed does not
mean that you've created entropy -- you've just made it hard for the
opponent to get at your PRNG seed.

"Anyone who considers arithmetical methods of producing random digits
is, of course, in a state of sin." -- John von Neumann

Perry

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