Peter Gutmann wrote:
> Consider for example a system that uses two
> authentication algorithms in case one fails, or that
> has an algorithm-upgrade/rollover capability, perhaps
> via downloadable plugins.  At some point a device
> receives a message authenticated with algorithm A
> saying "Algorithm B has been broken, don't use it any
> more" (with an optional side-order of "install and run
> this plugin that implements a new algorithm instead").
> It also receives a message authenticated with
> algorithm B saying "Algorithm A has been broken, don't
> use it any more", with optional extras as before.

Not so hard.  True breaks occur infrequently.  Those
that download the scam version will find that they can
*only* communicate with the scammers, so will sort
things out in due course and all will be well until the
next break - which will not happen for a long time, and
may well never happen - unless of course one has the
IEEE 802.11 working group designing the standards.

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