Early Leafs (2011 and 2012 model years) have the ability to select that
charging always stops at 80%.
I always use this to reduce stress on the battery in daily use as I do
not need the maximum range in daily use,
But this 80% charge has also been billed as a benefit for people who
live "on top of the hill" to allow them
To catch the regen energy when they descend from their home at the start
of the day and their trip.

Unfortunately, the EPA decided to average the 80 and 100% charge range
(which makes no sense)
To qualify the Leaf, so it has an arbitrary shorter range than its
actual battery capacity and therefor, 
Nissan decided to remove the ability of the Leaf to charge to 80% on
later model years.
Cor.

-----Original Message-----
From: EV [mailto:ev-boun...@lists.evdl.org] On Behalf Of EVDL
Administrator via EV
Sent: Thursday, May 04, 2017 10:48 PM
To: Electric Vehicle Discussion List
Subject: Re: [EVDL] EVs and altitude?

On 4 May 2017 at 15:28, John Lussmyer via EV wrote:

> But only if you have 100% efficient regen.

Obviously you're not going to get 100% efficient regen, but you'd be
surprised how close you can get under the right conditions in a well
designed real world vehicle.  

I've posted about this in the past, but here it is again:

http://www.evdl.org/pages/evergreen.html

Axel Krause of Brusa drove his EV over the Swiss Alps in 1997.  The
graph on the page above is a little confusing; what it shows is the
deviation of the car's amp-hour counter from what he usually got in
similar driving on flat ground.  You can see that by the end of the
trip, the amp-hours logged were right back to what they'd normally be
for a trip of that length taken on the flat.

The gist of it is this: thanks to the drive system's regeneration,
almost all the extra energy he used going up the mountain, he got back
on the way down.

(No doubt this wouldn't have worked as well if he'd started out the trip
with a descent.  With the battery already full, there'd be nowhere to
store the kinetic energy.)

On the average his outbound trip (Gams to Stabio) used 10.7kWh / 100km.

That's a more-than-respectable 173 Wh/mi.  It's also from the mains, not
just from the battery, so it includes the charger efficiency.  Not bad.

His average speed was 66km/h, or about 41mph.  

David Roden - Akron, Ohio, USA
EVDL Administrator

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