On Wednesday, November 21, 2012 1:36:58 PM UTC-5, John Clark wrote:
>
> On Mon, Nov 19, 2012  Craig Weinberg <whats...@gmail.com <javascript:>>wrote:
>
> > I would never claim there is no relationship between numbers and 
>> geometry, I claim that there is no function which geometry serves for 
>> arithmetic. 
>
>
> Pythagoras discovered and proved his famous theorem using geometry, only 
> later was it expanded into the world of numbers.    
>

That supports my point: People need geometry, computers don't. A world made 
by and for computers would not, could not contain any geometric objects.
 

>
> >> There is certainly a connection between the patterns of neurons in a 
>>> composer's brain and the patterns of sound he produces, if Beethoven were 
>>> given Crack his neurons would fire differently and his symphonies would 
>>> also be different.
>>>
>>
>> >A correlation among patterns in brain activity and acoustic vibration 
>> does not imply that vibrations in the air turn into an experience of sound. 
>>
>
> There is a test to determine which of our competing claims is true. Lets 
> monitor a composers brain, say John Williams, and see if Crack makes the 
> neurons in his brain fire in a atypical manner, if it does let him compose 
> some music under the influence of Crack. Then we bring in a panel of music 
> critics and ask them if the new composition is in Williams typical style. 
> Do you really think they will say it sounds just like the Star Wars theme? 
>

You keep missing your presumption of causality. Try it the other way. Lets 
use Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation to reproduce these brain pattens you 
are talking about. If we make John Williams brain activity exactly the same 
and run it in reverse, will crack smoke come out of his mouth? 


> > A computer is a collection of switches,
>>
>
> Yes.
>
>  > but it is only a collection in our imagination.
>>
>
> Bullshit. 
>

Bullshit is an ASCII string I don't care to parse...just like a computer 
can't parse 'itself' as a 'collection' of anything.
 

>
>  > The switches don't know that they are part of a collection. 
>>
>
> Yes, and a neuron in your brain doesn't know it's part of a collection. 
>

Of course it does. It is a living organism surrounded by it's identical 
twin siblings. That's how the neurons which have access to the image of the 
fire hydrant can find their way to collaborating with the words 'fire 
hydrant'. The entire brain is a community of living organisms in constant 
communication. You don't get that, do you?
 

>
> > They don't know there is a computer
>>
>
> And a neuron doesn't know there is a brain. 
>

What makes you pronounce that utterly unsupported edict?
 

>
> > Computers are great at doing very boring things very quickly. 
>>
>
> That's why people are so bored with computers, boring computers like 
> Xbox's and iPones and Blu Ray players and iPods.  
>

Computers don't play games, talk on the phone, watch TV or listen to music. 
Those things are interesting, fun things. Computers redraw thousands of 
pixels 75 times a second over and over forever. They negotiate 
telecommunication protocols to transfer messages that they cannot read 
between people they don't know.  You're a smart guy John, how can you not 
have the foggiest idea how obvious this is? I can only speculate strong 
hemispheric brain lateralization. I see the left and the right, while you 
see the right and the wrong.

Craig
  

>
> "Nyeaaah...What's up Doc?"
>>
>
> !
>
>   John K Clark
>
>
>  
>
>

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