1) Exchange2000 is 'self-tuning' (Is that Scharff laughing?).  There is no
performance optimiser, though third parties may be testing something
similar.

2) Exchange5.x uses its own directory services.  The directory database was
stored in a file called dir.edb.  Exchange2000 does not maintain its own
directory, but rather leverages the power and benefits of Active Directory.
Exchange information is now across all domain controllers and accessible
using ADSI or GUIs for AD.

3) Exchange2000 seems to believe the admin/installer is capable of assessing
drive optimisation.  Standard database and transaction log location follow
setups as they were in 5.x.

4) The M:\ drive is there for IFS.  However, I think it should not be
visible by default as this has caused more problems than benefit.  It also
may not be there in future releases.  Not many people are using IFS
correctly.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?url=/library/en-us/wss/wss/_es
dk_arch_win2k_ntfsifs.asp

William Lefkovics, MCSE-NT4, MCSE-W2K, A+, ExchangeMVP
-----------------------------------------------------------
Why just ride, when you can fly?
http://www.airborne.net 
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-----Original Message-----
From: Michael Anderson [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]]
Sent: Thursday, January 03, 2002 9:10 AM
To: Exchange Discussions
Subject: Basic Exchange 2K questions


Hello,

Are there any articles out there that explain why there are such
radical changes since Exchange 5.x -> 2000?

For example, maybe all of you can shed some light on 3 questions:

1. In 5.x - part of the install was a performance test of the system
   and all the hard drives - and it would suggest or let you specify
   where the message store and log files should go.

2. Why is Active Directory such a huge component of Exchange 2000
   functioning?

3. Why the heck does most of the data reside on a single drive by
   default?  This question sort of reverts back to question #1 - 
   and it just seems silly for the install process to not want to
   take advantage of multiple volumes, for performance reasons.

4. What's up with this "M" Drive?  I know it's a virtual drive, but
   it's just such an odd way for storing data.  Especially when you
   are trying to view the contents of the M Drive - you can only do
   it inside of Explorer, or Browsing through Folders.  If you try
   to expand the tree inside of the IIS Utility, it gives an error
   of not being able to list all the subdirectories.  It's just plain
   weird.

Thank you ALL so much for your answers -

Best Regards,

Mike



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