Thank you, Christine.  So far Baby has been only in the studio, completely 
isolated, when she visits us. It never occurred to me to do otherwise, not only 
because of felv but to avoid other contagious illnesses as well.

 

It typically takes us months to merge new cats into our setting. We go very 
slowly to avoid stress-related illnesses and spraying. So merging Baby in with 
ours for just a stay of a week or two would not be worth the tumult in the 
whole household.

 

It’s a luxury to be able to keep her separate and I’m grateful that I can. If I 
used the studio (which I don’t do when she’s here) I’d have to move her to 
another room because the equipment in the studio is dangerous for cats.

 

And I agree with your approach to the kitten. Sometimes circumstances are such 
that they are better off together. If I had two who were very attached to each 
other, and one turned up positive, I would not separate them.

 

I have a similar dilemma with our FIV kitty Cyril. He has a buddy, Micky, who 
is totally in love with Cyril. But Cyril had several birth defects (*) in 
addition to FIV, and has only one eye left. Micky plays very roughly, and I’m 
afraid Cyril will lose that eye to an injury. So I only allow them together 
when I can supervise them, and not because of the FIV. I make sure Micky gets 
plenty of other exercise first. I expect Micky will outgrow the roughness; he’s 
only 3.5 years old.

 

* A constellation of 7 birth defects can occur together in cats, including eye 
defects, multiple cardio problems, undescended testes, kinked tail, and some 
limb abnormalities.  Cyril got the eyes and the testes. But golly, he sure is 
cute!

 

 

- Lorraine

 

"Sometimes it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no 
one can imagine."  - Alan Turing 

 

From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
Christine Dundas
Sent: Friday, February 22, 2019 3:11 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Cleaning? Retesting?

 

My advice would be to keep FeLv and non-FeLv cats separated.  If you choose not 
to, you have to understand there is a chance the non-FeLv cats could get 
infected.  

 

Having said that, when my husband brought home a kitten that tested positive 
for FeLV, I had to make that choice.  We live in a small condo with two other 
cats.  We decided to keep her as long as she could be with us.  I had my two 
other cats vaccinated for FeLV.  They were adult cats, healthy in every way.   
There was no way I could keep everything and everyone separated.  Our little 
Ruthie passed away after almost two years.  My two adult cats tested negative 
afterwards, a few times.  And are still healthy and happy.  That was about four 
years ago.  

 

Christine

 

On Fri, Feb 22, 2019 at 2:46 PM Amani Oakley <aoak...@oakleylegal.com> wrote:

I had my Zander for seven years, mixed with a dozen other cats. I never took 
any precautions at all. It was too late by the time we figured out he had FeLV. 
No other cat ever got the infection.

 

Amani

 

From: Felvtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
Lorraine Johnston
Sent: February-22-19 2:04 PM
To: felvtalk@felineleukemia.org
Subject: Re: [Felvtalk] Cleaning? Retesting?

 

Thank you. I guess I should have phrased my question to indicate that I was 
concerned about spreading FeLV to my non-FeLV cats. If I understand correctly, 
your cats are, or were, all FeLV-positive, so there would not have been any 
non-FeLV cats to spread it to? 

 

I told my cousin back in December that I would also keep Baby in April when he 
goes way again. So now I’m trying to determine if that’s safe to do, and what 
additional precautions (if any) I should take while she’s here to avoid spread, 
now that we know she’s FeLV-positive.

 

Thank you,

 

- Lorraine

 

"Sometimes it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no 
one can imagine."  - Alan Turing 

 

From: FeLVtalk [mailto:felvtalk-boun...@felineleukemia.org] On Behalf Of 
dlg...@windstream.net

I have only had FELV  cats but never washed my hands after handling them.  I 
treated all the same and have had no experience of the disease spreading to 
others.  I have had up to 10 at a time as all who came to my house became part 
of my "pride".  As they came to me, I took them to the vet for a checkup, spay 
or neuter and they became mine.

 

----- Original Message -----

Hello again,

For those of you who have both FELV+ and - cats, how strenuous are your 
cleaning efforts? For instance, do you wash hands after just petting? Do you 
have your negative cats retested every year?

Thank you,

- Lorraine

"Sometimes it is the people no one can imagine anything of who do the things no 
one can imagine."  - Alan Turing

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