Hi,
Lol. I never got too much into video games as such, but I can remember
mindlessly moving the joystick around and playing PacMan. Needless to say, I
got hit by all manner of ghosties all the time...
Best Regards,
Hayden

-----Original Message-----
From: gamers-boun...@audyssey.org [mailto:gamers-boun...@audyssey.org] On
Behalf Of Tom Randall
Sent: Tuesday, April 13, 2010 3:19 PM
To: 'Gamers Discussion list'
Subject: Re: [Audyssey] How did you start?

Hi all.

Sorry for the late response, I've been busy around here.

This is a great topic.  For myself I began gaming on the Atari 2600 when I
was in high school, back then many of the games had pretty good sound cues
that actually meant something because of the limitations on graphics at the
time.  This made for some really great games that could be learned even by a
totally blind person which I am if you wanted to put the time and effort
into it.  I still own two 2600 systems and a lot of games, not sure how many
at the moment I've lost count.  I progressed through the atari computers of
the early to mid 80's, the 400, 800, 800xl and 130xe.  There were quite a
few games that could be played by us on these too.  I experimented with
doing some programming, however with no speech access whatsowever it was
simply too difficult to do anything really long or complex, although I do
remember sitting up nights and entering many a BASIC program out of some of
the old mags that I had access to.  I actually have a programming reference
manual in Braille around here still, and I have an Atari 800, an 800xl, and
a 130xe around here along with numerous games for them.  But back to gaming.
With the advent of the early Nintendo systems which is what we had where I
lived from the late 80's to early 90's I found that gaming access was far
more limited than before.  More emphasis was placed on graphics and the
sounds grew less and less meaningful.  For that reason I became somewhat
frustrated with mainstream gaming and pretty much quit it for a few years.

In the late 90's or maybe around 2000, I started reading about the Atari
Lynx which was the first color handheld system of its day and, like many
Atari products was extremely advanced and ahead of its time but failed due
to poor advertising.  I picked one up off of ebay with maybe a dozen games
and started experimenting with it.  I still have this system as well.
Gaming access was somewhat mixed.  While I can and do have fun with a few of
the games that I have, Switchblade II, asteroids, atari pinball and
roadblasters come to mind, many are pretty much not playable for us or at
least I haven't figured them out.  It's still a really cool system though
and I still get it out from time to time.

In the last two or three years I've really gotten back into mainstream
consoles with a vengeance thanks in no small part to some of you on this
list, you know who you are and I say thanks again.  I've picked up a Sega
Gennisis, a  psp, then a ps2, and most recently a ps3 with of course games
for all of them.  It is really great to see the resurgence of meaningful
sounds in many of the modern games, it's like the good old days in many ways
except the sounds themselves are of course much much better than they were
back then.  My ps2 is currently on loan to another blind friend who I am
teaching about gaming.  He is a formerly sighted guy who used to really love
gaming and had pretty much thought that he couldn't do it since losing his
sight.  My psp is pretty much inseparable from me it's always in my pack
with its charger and games.  I'm still just getting started with the ps3 but
so far it is the bomb!

Now to audio games.  I think the first audio game I discovered was grizzly
gulch from Bavisoft.  This game is really quite fun and the sound work is
extremely good, I only find it very sad that their support is so poor
especially recently.  After that I believe I got the first Troopanum from
BSC Games which led to my friendship with Justin and my starting to work
with BSC Games and Blindsoftware.com.  Over the years I have also picked up
all of the GMA games although I have frankly never done all that great at
Lone wolf.  I also have Rail Racer when I get in a mood for some driving and
racing, although again I have just not put the time into this one to get
good enough to want to compete online all that often.

Well that pretty much covers my gaming experience both in the mainstream and
the audio gaming genres.

Game on!

Tom

-----Original Message-----
From: gamers-boun...@audyssey.org [mailto:gamers-boun...@audyssey.org] On
Behalf Of dark
Sent: Monday, April 05, 2010 12:42 PM
To: Gamers@audyssey.org
Subject: [Audyssey] How did you start?


Hi. 

all this talk about if Is getting me a litle nostalgic, so i thought a topic
about how people got into audio games and such might be fun. 

For me, I'd always played what graffical games my eyesite could cope with,
first on an atari 2600 (at age 3 and 4), then an amstrad cpc computer
(similar to a comador 64), a comador amigar and finally a Snes (which i stil
own). 

But in the mid 90's with the 32 bit 3D era, the number of games I could play
dropped from about thirty percent, to almost none. 

Though I used a laptop for school work, and university, it never occurred to
me I could do anything with it bar write. Yes, I had the D&D manuals and
used it to do some tabletop gaming in about 99-2000 before I went to uni,
but I never actually thought of games. 

It wasn't until 2003, that I saw an artical in a braille publication
mentioning tom lorimers' whitestick.co.uk site and accessible computer
games. 

Despite a lot of net access shinanigans (hal version 5 and internet access
was fairly new at that stage), I found toms' site, and played a number of
online games like ashes of angels and legend of the green dragon. 

I do remember checking the offline games page, but A, the idea of a game
with sound I found rather bizarre, and B, I was stil using a five year old
laptop with windows 98. I did however play a lot of if. 

Things went on. I started on Sryth in late 2004, bought an xp desktop in mid
2005, then ran into Bryan peterson. When finding we both had defficient
eyeballs and an interest in exploration games he directed me towards shades
of doom (I stil remember sitting up all night playing it), and by degrees
audiogames.net. 

Sinse this corresponded with me finishing my masters and for various
confusing academic reasons having a lot of free time, i signed up to the
audiogames.net forum in 2006, and spent the next few months trying almost
the entire audiogames.net database, signing up to the audeasy list somewhere
along the line. 

And the rest is history. 

Beware the Grue! 

Dark.
---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to
gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org. You can make changes or update your
subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.


---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to
gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.


---
Gamers mailing list __ Gamers@audyssey.org
If you want to leave the list, send E-mail to gamers-unsubscr...@audyssey.org.
You can make changes or update your subscription via the web, at
http://audyssey.org/mailman/listinfo/gamers_audyssey.org.
All messages are archived and can be searched and read at
http://www.mail-archive.com/gam...@audyssey.org.
If you have any questions or concerns regarding the management of the list,
please send E-mail to gamers-ow...@audyssey.org.

Reply via email to