On 2015-11-02 19:36, Elle Stone wrote:
On 11/02/2015 10:02 AM, Jehan wrote:

On 2015-11-02 15:02, Elle Stone wrote:

On 11/02/2015 07:41 AM, Alexandre Prokoudine wrote:

2 нояб. 2015 г. 15:37 пользователь "Elle Stone" написал:

 > Also, what does "on-canvas" mean?

With old plugins, all interaction happens in a plugin's window. Compare
it to any tool like brush or crop that works directly on canvas.

Thanks! that helps to clarify the term.

About this specific point, I believe that many of us want more features
going "on-canvas" when possible.
In GIMP dev version, the filter are also previewed on-canvas (when
implemented as GEGL operations). I already discussed that it would be
very cool if import could end up with on-canvas preview as well at some
point (especially useful with lossy formats, etc.). These are only
passive canvas interaction, but I could imagine active interaction on
the canvas too in the future, and no only for tools. :-)

Canvas interaction are often much more intuitive than through a dialog
or a dock. And reproducing the image inside the dialog/dock is often
more of a workaround than a solution in my opinion (though in some
cases, it may have its good points).

Could you give some examples of "on canvas" tools and "not on canvas"
tools from GIMP 2.9? And maybe an example or two of a tool that is
currently not on canvas, that would be a good candidate for being "on
canvas"? I don't think I really understand the difference. Is drawing
a gradient an "on canvas" tool?

All tools are already on-canvas.

Until now, all filters were *not* on canvas, which was often annoying (having to test, cancel, test, cancel; or some filter could have its own preview window, more or less useful but in all case less featured than the canvas). Now since 2.9, we are able to have on-canvas preview for filters (GEGL ops), and we will likely soon have even partial previews (like part of the canvas previewing the operation side by side to non-filtered image. Mitch has a work-in-progress on the topic). We could even imagine have more on-canvas interaction. For instance what if a filter requires a rectangle source? Instead of having coordinate fields, allowing the user to drag a rectangle with the mouse on the canvas could be more intuitive.

That's all what on-canvas mean: allowing to work directly on the main canvas.


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