@John McKown, `git stash` can be "rewerted" with `git stash pop`, so it
cleans up the working directory only temporarily. So it does just what it
says it will do: put your changes in a stash.


On 2 July 2013 14:55, John McKown <john.archie.mck...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Dang it, don't do the "git stash" at all, it cleans up the working
> directory. Just do the "git status" and "git reset" parts. When you've
> gotten the index to contain only the files you want to commit (the
> rest will be untracked), then do the git commit and git push. Then
> just do a "git add -A ."
>
> On Tue, Jul 2, 2013 at 7:53 AM, John McKown
> <john.archie.mck...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Caution: Not an expert by any means.
> >
> > What I would do is this. First, I would do a "git stash".
> > <quote>
> >
> > Use git stash when you want to record the current state of the working
> > directory and the index, but want to go back to a clean working
> > directory. The command saves your local modifications away and reverts
> > the working directory to match the HEAD commit.
> >
> > The modifications stashed away by this command can be listed with git
> > stash list, inspected with git stash show, and restored (potentially
> > on top of a different commit) with git stash apply. Calling git stash
> > without any arguments is equivalent to git stash save. A stash is by
> > default listed as "WIP on branchname …", but you can give a more
> > descriptive message on the command line when you create one.
> >
> > The latest stash you created is stored in refs/stash; older stashes
> > are found in the reflog of this reference and can be named using the
> > usual reflog syntax (e.g. stash@{0} is the most recently created
> > stash, stash@{1} is the one before it, stash@{2.hours.ago} is also
> > possible).
> > </quote>
> >
> > Do a "git status" to find out what is staged to be committed (i.e. is
> > in the index). For each program which is staged in the index which you
> > don't want (a "git add" has been done but not yet committed), do a
> > "git reset HEAD file" to remove the changed, but not committed, file
> > from the index. This does not affect the contents of the file in the
> > working directory (it goes to untracked). When a "git status" shows
> > only the files what you want to commit in the section with the
> > heading: "Changes to be committed:", you can do the "git commit"
> > followed by a "git push". To get back to where you were, do a "git
> > stash pop".
> >
> > I'm 90+% sure this will get you what you want.
> >
> >
> >
> > On Tue, Jul 2, 2013 at 7:33 AM, <jayka...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>
> >> Hi,
> >>
> >> I'm having difficulty understanding how I should use git when I have
> multiple independent changes in a project. I have a local git repository
> for various windows & linux machines and I work on different parts of the
> project on different machines. The situation I have is that I am part way
> through some changes on one part of the project. On the same machine, I
> have made some quick changes to another part of the project and I would
> like to commit those changes and push them to the origin, _without_ having
> to commit the other changes that I am still working on. Surprisingly, I
> don't seem to be able to do this with git.
> >>
> >> - I can commit the completed changes without committing the uncompleted
> changes ok.
> >>
> >> - If I try to push the changes, git complains that I have unstaged
> changes and I should do a local merge.
> >>
> >> - I can't even seem do a local merge without pulling other changes from
> the origin.
> >>
> >> So now I've ended up with part-finished changes on the master. Not what
> I wanted!
> >>
> >> What should I be doing here?
> >>
> >> --
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> >>
> >>
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > This is a test of the Emergency Broadcast System. If this had been an
> > actual emergency, do you really think we'd stick around to tell you?
> >
> > Maranatha! <><
> > John McKown
>
>
>
> --
> This is a test of the Emergency Broadcast System. If this had been an
> actual emergency, do you really think we'd stick around to tell you?
>
> Maranatha! <><
> John McKown
>
> --
> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups
> "Git for human beings" group.
> To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an
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>
>
>

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