Here's something I've tried more than once for a loose fret. It
   probably depends on how the lute is set up. If it's quite loose, you
   can usually slide the loose fret up to the next position away from the
   nut. If there are several loose but otherwise functional frets, this
   saves a bit of work, and you only need replace the one fret for the gap
   you just created (closer to the nut).

   Bob Purrenhage

   On 3/11/2018 2:29 PM, anotherdamn6c . wrote:

   A good strategy and I've found it useful, Sterling. I do change frets
   about every 5 months usually for the wear. It only takes one plastic
   chanterelle to wear a spot down that can't be rotated out. (The best
   thing next to gut is gut) If I have to replace a 5th fret I usually 1,
   2, 3, and 4 also. Alternate times I change out 6, 7 and 8, too. By then
   they usually have a shim or have been tightened.
   New frets sounds so much better and require less pressure for a good
   clean sound. Having strings stopped at a point, however small, brings
   out more string overtones, imho. If I have a good lute and good
   strings, I'd rather not cut that corner more than parsimony demands.
   Btw, I went with doubled frets for a few years. The flat spot over two
   frets can sound dull or buzzy which can be both a bug and a feature. I
   went back to single frets because I found it more buggy and spendy than
   feature-y. For my doubled frets I used two singles and only replaced
   the more worn (the older) of the two, so the 'bridge fret' went nutward
   and the new one went to bridge side. Replacing both together always
   gave me more buzz than I was comfortable with.
   Sean

   On Sun, Mar 11, 2018 at 4:20 AM, spiffys84121
   [1]<[1]spiffys84...@cs.dartmouth.edu> wrote:

        I was going to make a video, but I think a few words will
     suffice.
        To tighten a loose fret, move the fret up to a very loose
     position
        until you can push one end of the fret through the knot. Pull it
     as
        tight as it will go just as you did when originally tying the
     fret.
        Usually you will get only a few millimeters of extra. Now, burn
     the
        existing bit with a soldering iron or match or flame-thrower or
     however
        you make heat. Put the fret in position. Now you'll never have to
     use
        ridiculously lame shims under your frets again.
        The very first time I put frets on a lute as a kid I said-"oh,
     you can
        tighten them if they get loose." And ever since then I've
     wondered why
        people use shims, or even the completely baffling practice of
     replacing
        loose frets. "Do they," I wondered "replace their shoe laces
     every time
        they tie their shoes?"
        Maybe I'm a dreamer, but I think we can end this strange shims
     and fret
        replacing practice in our lifetimes.
        Sterling
        Sent from my Verizon, Samsung Galaxy smartphone
     To get on or off this list see list information at
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References

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   2. [4]http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html



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References

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   2. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html
   3. mailto:spiffys84...@cs.dartmouth.edu
   4. http://www.cs.dartmouth.edu/~wbc/lute-admin/index.html

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