Experience has shown that most hurricane blown birds immediately return 
out-to-sea. You have to get out there during the storm or as soon as possible 
afterward.


On Sep 4, 2019, at 4:44 PM, Purbita Saha wrote:

> Thank you Shai and Peter for these insights. What day do you recommend going 
> out then to see what this devastating event dredges up? Saturday morning? 
> (Sorry if you already mentioned).
> 
> Cheers,
> Purbita Saha
> 
> On Wed, Sep 4, 2019 at 5:07 AM Shaibal Mitra <shaibal.mi...@csi.cuny.edu> 
> wrote:
> Dear Peter,
> 
> It's amazing to hear these first-hand accounts of your experiences in past 
> storms! And yes, access could be an issue for any storm that directly affects 
> our area. But a major reason why I posted these summaries was to show people 
> with less experience the birding potential of storms, like David, Fran, and 
> Ernesto, that pass inland well to the west of us and pose less of a direct 
> weather challenge to us. I particularly recall Ernesto, which after seemingly 
> immense hype regarding direct threats to Long Island, made landfall so far 
> south and west that birders mainly ignored him. I vividly recall driving over 
> the bridges to the beach in the morning and seeing Great South Bay's glassy, 
> mirror-like surface--"it's a mill pond!" I exclaimed to Pat, using indelicate 
> expressions as well. Even so, we had great birds that morning. Storms like 
> dorian that churn past to the south cause much more trouble and produce far 
> fewer rarities for us than do storms like David.
> 
> Shai Mitra
> Bay Shore
> ________________________________________
> From: Peter Post [pwp...@nyc.rr.com]
> Sent: Wednesday, September 4, 2019 12:39 AM
> To: Shaibal Mitra
> Cc: NYSBIRDS (NYSBIRDS-L@cornell.edu)
> Subject: Re: [nysbirds-l] Hurricane Dorian
> 
> All well and good, but the problem nowadays is access, access, access! Or I 
> should say lack of access!
> 
> I spent most of the Sept. 7th, 1979, during hurricane David, at Robert Mosses 
> SP. Every 10 or 15 minutes a small flock of Sooty Terns would fly by with an 
> occasional Bridled. By the end of the day I totaled 90 Sooty and 3 Bridled. 
> Nowadays that beach is closed during hurricanes!
> 
> On Sept. 27, 1985, during hurricane Gloria, the Jones Beach strip was open in 
> the morning but closed in the afternoon unless you could prove you had a 
> house on the strip. And it's been closed during hurricanes ever since. The 
> authorities I am told are afraid of looting. As a result I missed the 3,000 
> Cape May warblers that day, but I was able to get out to Pt. Lookout where a 
> Northern Phalarope was spinning in a puddle in the parking lot. And where I 
> had my first intermedius Lesser Black-backed Gull for NY.
> 
> During hurricane Irene, August, 27, 2011, I went to Central Park in the 
> morning hoping to see some storm blown birds. I ignored the signs that the 
> park was closed. The City is afraid that they will be sued if a branch or 
> tree hits or kills someone. There was nothing of interest on the Great Lawn 
> and the reservoir was covered in thick flog. I passed several police who 
> ignored me but I ran into the parks Director of Operations, whom I knew, and 
> who tried to evict me. Later that afternoon I tried my luck at Riverside 
> Park, where I ran into Dale Dancis and was later joined  by Ardith Bondi. I 
> added both Sooty and Bridled Terns, Wilson's and Leach's Storm-Petrels, Royal 
> Tern, and White-tailed Tropicbird to my NY County list. Ardith had a large 
> dark swift which I couldn't get on. Unfortunate, because there was a Black 
> Swift seen at Cape May that day! (All of this was written up in the Linnaean 
> Newsletter). The following year, during hurricane Sandy, one couldn't get 
> near the Hudson River. They authorities threatened us with arrest if we 
> didn't leave. We had to hide as best we could. But before being kicked out I 
> added Oystercatcher and Black Scoter to my NY Co., list.
> 
> If it isn't the closing of areas it's the downing of trees/power lines. 
> During one hurricane years ago I got as far as Bridgehampton. Downed tress 
> blocked my way from going any further east or to the beaches. When I tried 
> going back home a recently downed tree blocked my return. I wound up spending 
> the afternoon in the Bridgehampton High School which had been setup as a 
> shelter. Free coffee and donuts.Tony Lauro and Paul Buckley managed to make 
> it to Montauk Pt., but had to use a chainsaw to get there.
> 
> Peter Post
> 
> 
> 
> On Sep 3, 2019, at 8:57 PM, Shaibal Mitra wrote:
> 
> > The earliest models for Dorian’s track indicated a likelihood that the 
> > storm would track almost due north and pass to the west of Long Island—or 
> > at least parts of Long Island. This is the scenario that is likely to 
> > produce tropical terns and other Gulf Stream birds onshore on Long Island. 
> > With many people talking about Dorian and buzzing over the potential for 
> > storm birds, I’ve pulled out maps and bird data for several storms that 
> > passed west of or across Long Island near this date: David (1979), Fran 
> > (1996), Floyd (1999), Ernesto (2006), and Irene (2011)—all of these were 
> > productive for storm birds.
> >
> > For better or worse, at this point, it appears that Dorian will almost 
> > certainly whip out to sea to the south and east of us, as so many tropical 
> > systems do. Storms of this sort often interrupt the trans-oceanic 
> > migrations of species that would otherwise pass over us (various 
> > shorebirds, jaegers, Black Tern, etc.), but they do not bring tropical 
> > terns, etc.
> >
> > (Note: my obvious desire to see storm birds has NO influence on the weather 
> > and is not responsible for any harm or good wrought by any storm; the storm 
> > will do what it does, and we may simply wish to be prepared for the 
> > ornithological as well as other consequences).
> >
> > Shai Mitra
> > Bay Shore
> >
> >
> > 1979 Major Hurricane David
> >
> > https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/1979/Major-Hurricane-David
> >
> > From Richard L. Ferren, summarizing effects in Rhode Island: “A minimum of 
> > 62 Sooty Terns, at least five Bridled Terns, and a Brown Noddy passed Point 
> > Judith heading northeastward in the very late afternoon hours, with 
> > additional Sooties audibly passing the point after dark. Other Sooties were 
> > found dead at Napatree Point and seen exhausted inland at Kingston, while 
> > eight oystercatchers appeared at Napatree. More Sandwich Terns were seen 
> > the next day.  Five Royal,  16 Black,  and one Gull-billed Tern, and three 
> > Black Skimmers were also seen. A flock of 68 Red and six Red-necked 
> > Phalaropes at Galilee, and a Red-necked Phalarope and seven Black Terns 
> > were seen inland at Richmond the day of the storm; eight oystercatchers at 
> > Napatree the day after was then a large number. A final total of seven 
> > Sandwich Terns was a maximum count for the state at the time.”
> >
> >
> > 1996 Major Hurricane Fran
> >
> > https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/1996/Major-Hurricane-Fran
> >
> > morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20370719
> > morning: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20370663
> > evening: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20467354
> > next day: https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S20467579
> >
> >
> > 1999 Major Hurricane Floyd
> >
> > https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/1999/Major-Hurricane-Floyd
> >
> > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S24442955
> > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S27002826
> >
> >
> > 2006 Hurricane Ernesto
> >
> > https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/2006/Hurricane-Ernesto
> >
> > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S24420867
> >
> >
> > 2011 Hurricane Irene
> >
> > https://www.wunderground.com/hurricane/atlantic/2011/Hurricane-Irene
> >
> > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737686
> > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737724
> > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737900
> > https://ebird.org/view/checklist/S8737940
> >
> >
> > --
> >
> > NYSbirds-L List Info:
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
> > http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> >
> > ARCHIVES:
> > 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> > 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> > 3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01
> >
> > Please submit your observations to eBird:
> > http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> >
> > --
> >
> 
> 
> --
> 
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
> http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm
> 
> ARCHIVES:
> 1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
> 2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
> 3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01
> 
> Please submit your observations to eBird:
> http://ebird.org/content/ebird/
> 
> --
> 
> --
> NYSbirds-L List Info:
> Welcome and Basics
> Rules and Information
> Subscribe, Configuration and Leave
> Archives:
> The Mail Archive
> Surfbirds
> ABA
> Please submit your observations to eBird!
> --


--

NYSbirds-L List Info:
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsWELCOME.htm
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsRULES.htm
http://www.NortheastBirding.com/NYSbirdsSubscribeConfigurationLeave.htm

ARCHIVES:
1) http://www.mail-archive.com/nysbirds-l@cornell.edu/maillist.html
2) http://www.surfbirds.com/birdingmail/Group/NYSBirds-L
3) http://birding.aba.org/maillist/NY01

Please submit your observations to eBird:
http://ebird.org/content/ebird/

--

Reply via email to