On Sunday 03 March 2002 02:48 am, DL Neil wrote:
> Ken,
>
> > > Check out DAYOFMONTH() and MONTH() and a wealth of other useful date
> > > functions. RTFM: 6.3.4 Date and Time Functions
> >
> > There's a few interesting items here OK, Thanks for the pointer.
>
> Go for it...
>
> > > The answer to your question about AUTO_INCREMENT 'reset' can be
>
> found at
>
> > > 6.5.3 CREATE TABLE Syntax under "table_options".
> >
> >    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
> > EH? It says what?? I'm so green that this makes NO sense at all.
> >
> > Regards,table_options:
> >         TYPE = {BDB | HEAP | ISAM | InnoDB | MERGE | MRG_MYISAM |
>
> MYISAM }
>
> > or      AUTO_INCREMENT = #
>
> You asked:
> > Off Topic,  I saw something about resetting the auto-increment
>
> counter, but
>
> > now I can't find reference to it. Can some kind soul enlighten me???
>
> Sorry to overwhelm you with jargon - it can be difficult to assess a
> person's capabilities over the email. So by way of a general answer may
> I point you at the MySQL and PHP web site home pages, and from there to
> their links to tutorial books and web sites. These will help you with
> concepts and examples.
>
> The reference to "6.5.3 CREATE TABLE Syntax" is in the electronic manual
> at http://www.mysql.com/doc/C/R/CREATE_TABLE.html. The CREATE TABLE
> command enables you to (re-)build a table by defining its 'schema'
> (definitions, rules and/or constraints). The very next section of the
> manual, 6.5.4 ALTER TABLE Syntax deals with making changes to a table's
> structure.
>
> If you are starting from scratch the former applies. If amending an
> existing table, then the latter is of more interest. Logically enough
> both follow much the same rules in terms of what you can/can't do.
>
> Reading the CREATE TABLE command 'template', we see:
>
> CREATE [TEMPORARY] TABLE [IF NOT EXISTS] tbl_name
> [(create_definition,...)]
> [table_options] [select_statement]
>
> "table options" is therefore something that may be included almost at
> the end of the command. "may" is indicated by the square brackets =
> optional. So a 'bare' command would include the words CREATE and TABLE,
> followed by a table name, and then defining one or more fields within
> parentheses. eg
>
> CREATE TABLE Cinfo
> ( Cid INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
>   Fname  TEXT)
>
> The contents of the parentheses - a list of fields and their
> definitions, are templated by the two lists: "create_definition" and
> "type". Once the fields are defined (and the parentheses closed) you MAY
> then decide to add further descriptions of the table. These are defined
> in the "table_options" definitions, and include an additional
> specification of interest to you:
>
> AUTO_INCREMENT = #
>
> If you add this clause to the above and replace the # with a suitable
> integer, you can define the starting sequence number to be used in the
> ID column, eg:
>
> CREATE TABLE Cinfo
> ( Cid INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY,
>   Fname  TEXT)
> AUTO_INCREMENT = 1001;
>
> Hope that's enough to get you re-started. If you plug "AUTO_INCREMENT"
> into the electronic manual's search facility you find a ton of stuff
> showing you how to use such columns/series - and a few warnings.
>
> Ok?
> =dn
Great, that explains better than "most" of the tutorials I've read.
It is unfortunate that most if not all reference documentation expect the 
reader to have a college degree just on their subject in order to understand 
"wot in 'ell" they're saying.
I've done pretty well in figuring out many thing on my own but sometimes ya 
just need an expert to chip in and make yer day.
My thanks,
-- 
Ken Thompson, North West Antique Autos
Payette, Idaho
Email: [EMAIL PROTECTED]
http://www.nwaa.com
Sales and brokering of antique autos and parts.

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