Alex, Cristophe
I can see I've got quite a bit to learn. Thank you for drawing my attention
to the way FOR and Lisp work. I wasn't expecting that at all but it looks
very elegant. Thank you also for the extra examples. They do help.
Best Regards
Dean


On 24 November 2016 at 15:35, Christophe Gragnic <
christophegrag...@gmail.com> wrote:

> On Thu, Nov 24, 2016 at 1:24 PM, Alexander Burger <a...@software-lab.de>
> wrote:
> > Hi Dean,
> >
> >> : (T (== 1 1) T)
> >> !? (T (== 1 1) T)
> >> T -- Undefined
> >> ..
> >> i.e. I'm assuming this is a...
> >> "A list is evaluated as a function call, with the CAR as the function
> >> and the CDR the arguments to that function. These arguments are in turn
> >> evaluated according to these three rules."
> >> ..situation
> >
> > Correct.
>
> Hi Alex, I'm not sure that you understood Dean's question.
> Or maybe I didn't understand your answer.
>
> What Dean did:
> To understand your definition of mmbr, Dean extracted this line:
> (T (== 1 1) T)
> from the «for». Bad luck, the «for» function is what is called in some
> lisps
> a «special form»: its arguments are not evaluated.
> I think that in picoLisp it's called an f-expression.
>
> Another example of a special form is the «if» function.
> It doesn't evaluate every argument since it must first know
> if the condition is true or false.
> The evaluation of the true branch (or the false branch) is delayed
> and done «manually».
>
> Some examples in picoLisp:
>
> : (de f (x) x)  # could have been defined with setq or set
> -> f
> : f
> -> ((x) x)
> : (f (+ 2 2))
> -> 4
>
> : (de f x x)  # could have been defined with setq or set
> -> f
> : f
> -> (x x)
> : (f (+ 2 2))
> -> ((+ 2 2))  # the list of the args passed to f
>
> : (de f x (caar x))
> -> f
> : f
> -> (x (caar x))
> : (f (+ 2 2))
> -> +
>
> The «for» function kind of inspects its args to find «clauses»
> and treat them specially, not as usual function calls.
> That's why brutally extracting them from
> the «for» construct doesn't work.
>
> An example of this kind is the «let» construct:
>
> : (let (X "Hello" Y "world") (prinl X " " Y))
> Hello world
>
> Here X is not a function but a symbol to which "Hello" is bound.
>
> We could also say that «for» and «let» are f-expr that use
> some s-expr as data instead of function calls.
>
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fexpr
> https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sexpr
>
> Hope this helps.
>
>
> chri
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