See "Software Creativity 2.0" by Robert Glass for a practitioner-oriented
accessible treatment.
Its a great book that is basically written as a narrative of the author's
thoughts on programming creativity.
Since it is very accessible, very broad, and heavily grounded in
practitioner experience, It might be a good starting point.

http://www.developerdotstar.com/books/software_creativity_glass.html

I have read both the original and the new version, and recommend the new one
(at the above link).

John Daughtry
Penn State University
http://john.daughtryhome.com




On Tue, Mar 23, 2010 at 8:48 AM, alex <a...@slab.org> wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I'm wondering if models of creative processes in programming have been
> proposed in the literature.
>
> It seems to me there are several models involved.  Firstly, models in
> a programmer's head of what a program is for and/or how it should
> operate.  Secondly, models in the computer, the structured text of the
> source code, and (when married with a language interpreter), its
> operation over time.
>
> Considering the case of a programmer working without a clear
> specification, for example to compose some music or some other partly
> serendipitous task, the relationship between the program and
> programmer seems complex and dynamic.  The programmer somehow has an
> idea, comes up with an algorithm to implement it, and then types it in
> to their text editor.  The process of typing in the algorithm requires
> that everything about it is made explicit, including areas of its
> operation that the programmer may not have considered.  This may feed
> back to cause the programmer to modify the original idea they had.
> They then run the algorithm which might surprise the programmer with
> unintended consequences, good or bad, again causing them to reflect
> upon and modify their original idea.  The programmer decides on the
> next edit in response, and around it goes.
>
> I imagine work has already been done in this area, could anyone
> suggest references?  I'd be very interested in any opinions on the
> above ideas too, and on the subject of programming and creativity in
> general.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> alex
>
> --
> The Open University is incorporated by Royal Charter (RC 000391), an exempt
> charity in England & Wales and a charity registered in Scotland (SC 038302).
>
>

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