For the record, the unit of time measurement in Ruby is seconds, which
explains the reason behind that choice for Prototype.

Given the backwards compatibility issues, and the benefits of using
seconds rather than milliseconds in most but edge cases, there's litte
chance of seeing that change.

Best,

Tobie

On Oct 10, 2:30 pm, "T.J. Crowder" <t...@crowdersoftware.com> wrote:
> I, for one, found the units used by Function#delay (for example) to be
> very surprising when I first saw them, and I have to stop and think
> every time I use Function#delay.  The usual unit for that sort of
> thing in every language I've worked in other than BASIC is
> milliseconds.
>
> That said, I don't see changing them barring a wholescale Prototype
> API rewrite.
>
> -- T.J.
>
> On Oct 9, 2:39 pm, Allen Madsen <bla...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > Joran,
>
> > The type of number extensions you described aren't part of prototype.
> > Therefore, it is simpler for developers who aren't using such an
> > extension to use seconds. I'm not opposed to the switch, but I wanted
> > to throw out a possible explanation for the way it is today.
>
> > Allen Madsenhttp://www.allenmadsen.com
>
> > On Fri, Oct 9, 2009 at 9:18 AM, Joran Greef <jorangr...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > I've been using some Number extensions of my own for some time:
> > > Number.seconds, Number.minutes, Number.hours etc. where (2).minutes()
> > > would return the 2 minutes expressed as milliseconds e.g. 120000,
> > > (2).seconds() would return 2000 etc.
>
> > > It's been great for defining config files e.g.:
>
> > > Config.Database.recentThreshold = (2).minutes();
> > > Config.Http.timeout = (60).seconds();
>
> > > I think Rails does the same and that may be where I got the idea from.
> > > I've also added Number.kilobytes, Number.megabytes, etc.
>
> > > It would be great if interfaces which receive a time or quantity value
> > > as an option, such as PeriodicalExecuter, could expect the value to be
> > > expressed in the lowest common denominator unit practical, i.e.
> > > milliseconds rather than seconds. Java does it, and so does
> > > Javascript's own setInterval, setTimeout etc. It would follow the
> > > principle of least surprise and make units of measurement easier to
> > > compare.
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