I'm thinking of something like the RFC process for Internet protocols.
By the way, on a related note, once the "Twitter link shortener" I've
been hearing rumors about is in place, can we have all the links in
tweets sent from the API shortened with it? Profile images, user
object URLs, etc. ;-)

Part of this stems from my concern over something I thought I heard
yesterday about Twitter building its own "place" database. There are
dozens of place databases - why does Twitter need another one?

On Apr 15, 6:05 am, Raffi Krikorian <ra...@twitter.com> wrote:
> please feel free to point us to standards that you would like us to
> consider.  we are really attempting to make this insanely simple by
> literally just having a triple of items to store (namespace, key, value) --
> so, we are just really talking about representation, i assume.
>
>
>
> On Thu, Apr 15, 2010 at 12:09 AM, <zn...@comcast.net> wrote:
>
> > ----- "Jud" <jvale...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > > On Apr 14, 5:05 pm, James Teters <jtet...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > > > Any ideas on size limitations or restrictions for this meta data?
> > > good question; I have the same one.
>
> > > simple math based on average tweet status byte size (of status
> > > structure coming through the streaming or REST interface) tells us
> > > that it wouldn't take much being jammed into the annotation's field
> > > to
> > > double that size. what status size increase is Twitter's
> > > infrastructure ready/willing to tolerate?
>
> > > it seems to me that a few things are NOT candidates for the
> > > annotations field(s):
> > > - void * (for you old schoolers on the list)
> > > - media who's original native format is binary (e.g. photos/videos)
>
> > > annotations will need limitations like:
> > > - overall size
> > > - if key/value pairs become the model... they'll need individual size
> > > limitations (for name and value)
> > > - max number of pairs
> > > - etc.
>
> > > the whole thing feels driven by the answer to the original "size"
> > > question.
>
> > > another question would be whether or not the tweet originator can
> > > remove annotations that others put on their tweet? I'd assume that
> > > I'd
> > > have control over my original tweet in that manner (e.g. "notes"
> > > functionality on Flickr)
>
> > > --
> > > To unsubscribe, reply using "remove me" as the subject.
>
> > In addition to size constraints, I'd like to *strongly* suggest that
> > wherever possible, annotations use *existing* open standards! Please, let's
> > not "reinvent the semantic web", even if we can. ;-)
>
> --
> Raffi Krikorian
> Twitter Platform Teamhttp://twitter.com/raffi

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