IMHO, it may be possible to enrich U-235 using LENR. But depleted U-238
might be an acceptable fission/LENR fuel.

On Thu, Aug 24, 2017 at 10:00 AM, JonesBeene <jone...@pacbell.net> wrote:

> *From: *Axil Axil <janap...@gmail.com>
>
>
> … The thorium blanket would shield and absorb the muons produced by the
> LENR reaction and no radioactive byproducts or fissile material would
> result.
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> As I have posted several times recently in light of Holmlid’s claims – it
> seems possible to combine fission and LENR in a subcritical arrangement.
> The challenge is to supply UDH as if it was neutron flux.
>
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> The neutron substitute would be UDH, and not muons per se although both
> would be important in the scheme,
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> Thorium as a fuel would be possible in this regard, but as of today it is
> too costly and too “light” to compete with U.
>
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> Muons tend to be absorbed best by extremely dense metals like Uranium. It
> should be noted that thorium is far less dense than Uranium and because of
> low demand, it is also an order of magnitude more expensive. Proponents say
> the cost will drop with demand, but there is no proof of that and the lower
> density cannot be changed.
>
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>
> Density:
>
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> U – 18.950  gm/cc
>
> Th – 11.720 gm/cc
>
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> Thorium is a heavy metal relatively speaking – in fact it is denser than
> lead - but Uranium is a whopping 62% denser than thorium - and would be
> better as a subcritical fuel for a hybrid reactor - even if the cost were
> the same.
>
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> There is minimal information online about muon stopping power, but the
> chart here that shows a straight line dependence on Z while explaining that
> it should not be straight.
>
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> http://scipp.ucsc.edu/outreach/internships/2007/
> references/Muon%20Absorption.pdf
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