Jed—

You missed the point of using a submarine hull!

It can be anchored 500 to 1000 feet below sea level with a large differential 
pressure when there is a valved vent pipe connected to the surface.

I agree the hull volume would not be a ”Banks Lake” volume feeding Grand Coulee 
Dam. But may be as large as 10,000  cubic meters and able to supply energy for 
a small community near the sea for a night or so to supplement solar or wind 
power.

Bob

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________________________________
From: Jed Rothwell <jedrothw...@gmail.com>
Sent: Thursday, November 2, 2017 4:51:00 PM
To: Vortex
Subject: Re: [Vo]:Article on approaches to energy storage

bobcook39...@hotmail.com<mailto:bobcook39...@hotmail.com> 
<bobcook39...@hotmail.com<mailto:bobcook39...@hotmail.com>> wrote:

An old submarine hull (ridged structure) would work nicely as a reservoir.

That's an underwater reservoir:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pumped-storage_hydroelectricity#Underwater_reservoirs

That is MUCH too small. It has to have hundreds or even thousands of times more 
capacity than that to hold a significant amount of energy. The water pressure 
is low. The reservoir is not far below sea level. It is not like a dam with 
water falling hundreds of feet.

Typical pumped storage lakes are 30 to 50 million cubic meters.

- Jed

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