David Smith said:

 

"You never know.

 

Thanks to irony, my apartment is in a dead spot, where I can't get my own
company's wireless service, so I've got a cable modem at home. Right now, my
home router's IP address is assigned from a /20 - the router reports my
network mask as 255.255.224.0, and my default gateway really is a couple
thousand addresses away.

 

Being a cable company with positively obscene amounts of money, I'd assume
they're using some sort of fancy VLAN solution, or at least a really smart
switch. But heck, I don't really know. One of these days, I'll be bored, and
plug in the notebook, with Wireshark running, just to see what kind of other
traffic I can see out there..."

 

 

 

 

 

UH OH!! You let the dogs out!! Let the games begin. lol        

 

 

HERE WE GO:

 

Routing -vs- a flat bridge is a no brainer IMHO. There are exceptions to
this rule when a man owns a small WISP service of a couple to a hundred or
so (who knows where the transition lies?) to move over to a dynamically
routed network. It's not a terribly hard transition to make if one prepares
for this transition. I can also say that a network with good switches that
are capable VLAN's and Trunking can absolutely do a wonderful job - - maybe
as good a job as a routed network, but then some of the benefits of a routed
network out weigh (IMHO again) the ease of a Trunked/VLAN network. The major
turning point for me away from the Trunked/VLAN'd network was the BS you
have to go through for RSTP to actually provide that failover redundancy on
a network my size and all the switches that must be informed/config'd for
the failover to failover all the way back to the NOC with the VLANS still
intact and functional - passing traffic. If you have a dynamically routed
network then OSPF just works and it appears that it works well - - I mean it
just does its thing.

 

 I am a hard head and when I started this service about 5 years ago I had no
network experience at all - NONE! I was a towboat Captain on the Inland
waterways and own a Forklift sales/service company as well I had never even
formatted a PC so understand that I started as a complete imbecile and have
moved way up the ladder to just "dumb" today, but I can testify to the world
that a bridged network is easy - it works - it works with hundreds and
hundreds and hundreds of subs, but then it certainly has its short comings
as well. I don't think that a new man in the ISP business with no experience
needs to route his first 20 clients on three different APS because so many
out here think that bridging is the Devil. It's not the Devil nor was it
conjured up from beyond the gates of hell. It is a vital transport service
and many large government facilities have huge - -I mean huge - completely
bridged VLAN'd/Trunked networks. It does work and it is another means of
providing service.

 

NOW -with that said I can attest that I have been in all 4 situations - - -
flat bridge, VLAN bridged, static routed (that's just ugly, unnecessary & a
major PITA IMNHO) and currently moving segments of the VLAN'd network to a
dynamically routed to clients and a  bridged backhaul. Routing is not hard -
as a matter of fact it's plumb easy, but it is not always the answer. I
attribute those who have the attitude of "route or die" in the same class as
those who say "open source rules and MS sux big fat ones"  - - it shows a
complete bias and ignorance - - once again - - IMNHO. The real truth is that
a well educated & well rounded network engineer will use MS for its
strengths and open source solutions where it can be best utilized. MS has
some really good stuff, but then I run a dozen FreeBSD & CentOS servers
along with 1 MS2003 server. I think that bridging-vs-routing ought to fall
amongst those same lines - - choose the one that fits and use it knowing
that you may need to change your ways down the road depending on network
size/sub count and manageability.

 

 

Education and understanding is vital in any business. Open eyes and an
ability/willingness to see another's view point is just as important. If you
are going to try to help someone or steer someone in any direction - - you
better stand in their shoes, examine what it is that will be of the most use
to them and most beneficial for them and THEIR network. The "route or die"
theme is not always right, but it's not the Devil either. If you are going
to be a help to a fellow WISP - - ck out his knowledge and don't lead him
into something that is overkill, terrible complex and don't add a bunch of
unneeded crap on his network that he can't manage. If his network runs today
and he can manage it then take one small step at a time with EDUCATION being
at the forefront of the process. I would hate to be the one who dealt "pure
misery" to a man (and his clients) in the name of friendship by leading him
where he didn't absolutely need to be because I am a routing idiot and have
a bias to such actions. 

 

SUMMARY: USE THE SHOE THAT FITS - ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL - EVER!

 

 

The saga of 

Mac Dearman

 

-----Original Message-----
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED] On
Behalf Of David E. Smith
Sent: Sunday, December 03, 2006 10:32 AM
To: WISPA General List
Subject: Re: [WISPA] Routed vs bridged (again)...

 

Butch Evans wrote:

 

>> There are nearly 4000 (unfortunately not all mine :-) 100meg customers 

>> on that network.

> 

> I don't want to argue this point, because I just don't have enough 

> information about the network.  I seriously doubt, though, that all 

> those customers are all on a single /20 network (which would support 

> 4096 hosts).  Even worse, if there are routers there, too, it may need a 

> /19 (which would accomodate over 8000 customers).  If they are not, take 

> my word for it...they are routed.

 

You never know.

 

Thanks to irony, my apartment is in a dead spot, where I can't get my 

own company's wireless service, so I've got a cable modem at home. Right 

now, my home router's IP address is assigned from a /20 - the router 

reports my network mask as 255.255.224.0, and my default gateway really 

is a couple thousand addresses away.

 

Being a cable company with positively obscene amounts of money, I'd 

assume they're using some sort of fancy VLAN solution, or at least a 

really smart switch. But heck, I don't really know. One of these days, 

I'll be bored, and plug in the notebook, with Wireshark running, just to 

see what kind of other traffic I can see out there...

 

David Smith

MVN.net

-- 

WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

 

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:

http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

 

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/

-- 
WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org

Subscribe/Unsubscribe:
http://lists.wispa.org/mailman/listinfo/wireless

Archives: http://lists.wispa.org/pipermail/wireless/

Reply via email to