> There are still plenty of enthusiastic, younger folks who are most
>> definitely into running the "genuine old hardware" - it's just that
> this

> list hasn't traditionally offered much of a draw for these users. As
> noted,

> the list was formed by and for users of the classic-era 'big iron'
> gear,

> many of whom have simply succumbed to attrition in one form or another.
Actually, it wasn't. I have been a member almost from day 1, and my first
> question to the list founder (I think it was Selam) was 'Are

> welcome on the list, or is it micros only?'

If my previous observations on the genesis of the list don't match reality,
I'm perfectly willing to be corrected - in fact, I like what I've been
hearing about the origins of the list. That said, the vast majority of list
traffic seems to focus on minicomputers "and up" (or, and back as it were),
and I assumed that it's always been this way.

As another member recently noted, much of what tumbles past me on this list
is totally outside of my 'classic computer' world. Though, again, I'd have
no trouble whatsoever geeking out - and fully - over some mini hardware, if
that's the sort of thing I could possibly have room for in my home or my

This said, it's clear to see that most of the list traffic is well outside
of the 8-bit / 16-bit micro era. And if the list is to survive over the
long-term, then more of the micro kids like myself need to be brought
deeper into the fold. Don't you think?

On Fri, Oct 14, 2016 at 4:26 PM, Fred Cisin <ci...@xenosoft.com> wrote:

> On Fri, 14 Oct 2016, jim stephens wrote:
>> There are a number of 1970 postings, which clearly were sent with 0 time
>> stamp values, and accepted by the mailing agent and archived with the 1970
>> time frame.  They are not all the same in each snapshot.
>> Appreciate your capture of these.
> Sometimes you can get hints of what OS and/or software was on the
> originating machine - if you don't set the date, what does your machine
> default to?
> Besides the posts that had no time-stamp, or faulty/corrupted ones,. . .
> Was John Titor on this list?
> Slysoft is GONE, partially but not completely replaced, . . .
> One version of ANYDVD that I use requires any date prior to a certain one;
> that machine is set for October 14, 1988.  1988 (a leap year) is the most
> recent year that has days-of-week and dates the same as 2016. Non-leapyears
> have much easier calendar substitutions.

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