We totally understand the apache way of doing things and the projects has
always been welcoming users as contributors from days of DMLC.  This
happens in MXNet, as well as other project, for example XGBoost (
https://github.com/dmlc/xgboost) , another project that originated from
DMLC have most of its committers recruited from user of the project(who
contributed heavily).

So we are all for being welcoming in terms of contributions, without
lock-down access of the code. This is actually exactly the reason why we
want to formalize this process. A new comitter should not be nominated
because he/she simply knows more PMCs, or he/she is in the "inner circle"
of the community. The nomination should be purely based on the
 contributions, supported by facts and statistics. Sometimes I get
complains about from contributors who say why this person is get
committer-ship while my contribution is more significant.  Having a public
standard makes this transparent and fair to all users who are contributing,
and encourages them to hold up to the standard.

Finally, the fact that such practice carries out in other successful Apache
projects(e.g. Mesos) put weights in this as well.

Tianqi


On Tue, Aug 8, 2017 at 1:12 PM, Isabel Drost-Fromm <isa...@apache.org>
wrote:

>
>
> Am 4. August 2017 13:27:16 MESZ schrieb Chiyuan Zhang <plus...@gmail.com>:
> >1. There are some people who contribute to MXNet due to something else
> >(e.g. he used MXNet in his project and would like to contribute back
> >examples, or bug fix, or new operators, etc.)
>
> Many Apache projects are building software where end users are developers,
> not unlike what happens at mxnet I suppose.
>
> Now from what I've seen a common pattern for successfully recruiting new
> committers, growing and diversifying communities is a scratch your own itch
> approach: I know of several ppl who came to an Apache project as mere
> users, who started fixing things they needed fixed and who became
> committers to projects before they knew what was happening to them. In my
> experience those are the people who turned into project members who stayed
> longer than anyone else, they had a vested interest in staying. Often over
> time these people turned into Foundation members, helping out in various
> ways, e.g. mentoring new projects entering through the incubator.
>
> From my experience, my advise would be to treat everyone on any of your
> lists as potential committer. Instead of trying to protect the project from
> evil by locking down access try to establish a project vision and
> contributing guidelines that make it easy to get involved in the right way
> - whatever that means for mxnet, community over code is core to how the
> foundation works because at the end of the day your project lives and dies
> with ppl being interested in spending time on it (or not).
>
> That shouldn't imply that it's not a good idea to write down how to become
> a committer, you'll get that question often soon enough and will get tired
> answering it ;)
>
>
> Hope this helps,
> Isabel
>
>
>
> --
> Diese Nachricht wurde von meinem Android-Gerät mit K-9 Mail gesendet.
>

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