+1 to stay with LTS and drop deprecated technologies

On Mon, Apr 16, 2018 at 5:38 PM, Andrea Del Bene <an.delb...@gmail.com>
wrote:

> I think we should stay stick with LTS releases (one main release per year)
> and provide support only for that specific LTS. I think this is what most
> of the market will do in the future. As we are seeing with Java 9, it's
> nearly impossible to adapt Wicket to the "next" Java without cutting
> deprecated technologies or without adapting to the new behavior of Java
> standard libraries (like date time).
>
>
>
> On 16/04/2018 11:52, Martijn Dashorst wrote:
>
>> All,
>>
>> With the new release schedule of Java where they will (have)
>> release(d) Java 9, 10 and 11 in one year, what will we do with
>> Wicket's dependency on Java?
>>
>> Will we move with the Long Term Support versions? AFAIK this will
>> require us to upgrade every year to a new major version.
>>
>> Or will we stay with LTS-- as our major supported Java version?
>>
>> If so, how do we work with deprecated technologies that we (or our
>> dependencies) use when they get removed, or Wicket plain stops working
>> on Java 10 (or Java 11), or stops building on one such version?
>>
>> In the long run, I don't think it is possible for us to align Wicket
>> versions with major Java versions as we could in the previous years:
>>
>> - wicket 1.5 -> Java 5 (actually Wicket 1.4, but who's counting)
>> - wicket 6 -> Java 6
>> - wicket 7 -> Java 7
>> - wicket 8 -> Java 8
>>
>> would the next major version of Wicket be 11?
>>
>> - wicket 11 -> Java 11?
>>
>> Martijn
>>
>
>


-- 
WBR
Maxim aka solomax

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