On Saturday, June 16, 2012 3:55:03 PM UTC-4, Brent wrote:

Thanks, that make my point exactly:

"This entropy, H(S|O), depends on the information that a given observer, O, 
has about S, and the work necessary to erase a system may therefore vary 
for different observers."

Craig

 
>
> Or have a look at:
>
> arXiv:1009.1630v2 <http://arxiv.org/abs/1009.1630v2> [quant-ph]
> *The thermodynamic meaning of negative entropy* 
> LĂ­dia del Rio <http://arxiv.org/find/quant-ph/1/au:+Rio_L/0/1/0/all/0/1>, 
> Johan 
> Aberg <http://arxiv.org/find/quant-ph/1/au:+Aberg_J/0/1/0/all/0/1>, Renato 
> Renner <http://arxiv.org/find/quant-ph/1/au:+Renner_R/0/1/0/all/0/1>, Oscar 
> Dahlsten <http://arxiv.org/find/quant-ph/1/au:+Dahlsten_O/0/1/0/all/0/1>, 
> Vlatko 
> Vedral <http://arxiv.org/find/quant-ph/1/au:+Vedral_V/0/1/0/all/0/1>
> (Submitted on 8 Sep 2010 (v1 <http://arxiv.org/abs/1009.1630v1>), last 
> revised 27 Jun 2011 (this version, v2))
>
> Landauer's erasure principle exposes an intrinsic relation between 
> thermodynamics and information theory: the erasure of information stored in 
> a system, S, requires an amount of work proportional to the entropy of that 
> system. This entropy, H(S|O), depends on the information that a given 
> observer, O, has about S, and the work necessary to erase a system may 
> therefore vary for different observers. Here, we consider a general setting 
> where the information held by the observer may be quantum-mechanical, and 
> show that an amount of work proportional to H(S|O) is still sufficient to 
> erase S. Since the entropy H(S|O) can now become negative, erasing a system 
> can result in a net gain of work (and a corresponding cooling of the 
> environment). 
>
> Where is shown explicitly how extract energy by erasing information.
>
> Brent
>  
>
>       
>  
>  > You can't compress the substance, because it is not information. 
>> Information is a subjective (or intersubjective) measurement, nothing more 
>> and nothing less. 
>>
>
> If information is just subjective then when you've had a few too many 
> drinks and a charcoal briquette starts to look like a diamond to you then 
> it really is a diamond because the only difference between the two is the 
> information on how the carbon atoms are arranged. If your above statement 
> is true then it is also objectively true that you Craig Weinberg can turn 
> charcoal into diamond with nothing but the power of your mind. Sounds like 
> a comic book superhero. 
>
>   John K Clark
>
>
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