It should be mentioned that final causation requires downward causation to
be operative.
See George Ellis for examples of downward causation at the human level.
http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1212/1212.2275.pdf

Recognising Top-Down Causation
George Ellis, University of Cape Town

Abstract: One of the basic assumptions implicit in the way physics is
usually done is that all causation flows in a bottom up fashion, from micro
to macro scales. However this is wrong in many cases in biology, and in
particular in the way the brain functions. Here I make the case that it is
also wrong in the case of digital computers – the paradigm of mechanistic
algorithmic causation - and in many cases in physics, ranging from the
origin of the arrow of time to the process of quantum state preparation. I
consider some examples from classical physics; from quantum physics; and
the case of digital computers, and then explain why it this possible
without contradicting the causal powers of the underlying micro physics.
Understanding the emergence of genuine complexity out of the underlying
physics depends on recognising this kind of causation. It is a missing
ingredient in present day theory; and taking it into account may help
understand such mysteries as the measurement problem in quantum
mechanics:



On Mon, Aug 26, 2013 at 3:31 AM, Roger Clough <rclo...@verizon.net> wrote:

>  Leibniz's final causation as the Self, the active agent of change
>
> So far, materialistic models of the mind, such as Dennett's,
> are essentially passive.  There is no internal active agent of change,
> which one might call the Self.
>
> The internal active agent of change is desire, which we might
> define as a mismatch between the current state and a goal.
> In other words, the internal active agent of change is final
> causation, which has been discussed by Leibniz as typical of
> life, and also by Aristotle in his four basic causes of change.
>
> This desire to achieve a personal goal appears mentally as
> an intention, which is the active agent of change.  This is what
> we call the Self, and is the missing element of AI as well as
> current models of the mind.
>
>
> Dr. Roger B Clough NIST (ret.) [1/1/2000]
> See my Leibniz site at
> http://independent.academia.edu/RogerClough
>
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