Other early and notable Detroit bands:

The Stooges - Iggy Pop:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Stooges

The Stooges performing in Austin, Texas, 2007:
http://youtu.be/XL22_2g-4O8

[image: Inline image 1]

Bob Seeger & The Silver Bullet Band:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bob_Seger

Marshall Crenshaw:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marshall_Crenshaw

MC5 - Motor City 5:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MC5

Mitch Ryder & The Detroit Wheels:
http://youtu.be/j9eWGdJIW74

Suzi Quatro:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro

SRC:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SRC_(band)

The Amboy Dukes w/Ted Nugent:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Amboy_Dukes

Teaearden and van Winkle:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teegarden_&_Van_Winkle


On Wed, Nov 6, 2013 at 9:21 AM, Richard J. Williams <pundits...@gmail.com>wrote:

>  Suzi Quatro was born in Detroit, MI, USA and grew up there - her father
> worked for General Motors. Quatro moved to England in 1971. In 2010 she was
> voted into the Michigan Rock and Roll Legends online Hall of Fame.
>
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro
>
>
> On 11/5/2013 9:55 PM, s3raph...@yahoo.com wrote:
>
>
>
> Re "Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major
> rock star.":
>
>
>  Yeah, I liked "Can the Can". Quatro made it as a star in the UK (and
> *not* the USA) of course.
>
>
> ---In fairfieldlife@yahoogroups.com, <punditster@...> <punditster@...>wrote:
>
>  Detroit - Motor City Bands
>
>  Suzi Quatro -She is the first female bass player to become a major rock
> star.
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Suzi_Quatro
>
>  Suzi Quatro - Can The Can, 1973:
> http://youtu.be/xYoogY-UGio
>
>  [image: Inline image 1]
>
>
>  On Tue, Nov 5, 2013 at 1:24 PM, Share Long <sharelong60@...> wrote:
>
>
>  noozguru, let's not forget the Motor City music scene...
>
>
>
>
>   On Tuesday, November 5, 2013 1:05 PM, Bhairitu <noozguru@...> wrote:
>
>   Before for the Beatles it was regional rock groups that were the scene
> in the US.  There was Northwest Rock which included the Kingsmen, Sonics
> and way back the Ventures (playing their cover of a jazz tune "Walk Don't
> Run").  Then the northwest do-wap groups like the Fleetwoods (I played on a
> revival album they did).  There was also an east coast scene, a Chicago
> area scene and New Orleans scene.  These were often regional because the
> labels were regional without national distribution.
>
> Also before the Beatles let's not forget folk period which includes The
> Kingston Trio, Lamplighters (I backed them up once) and other spin offs.
> Those morphed into folk rock groups in the later 60s.
>
> Regional music scenes in the US would be a lot like European country's and
> their own scenes.
>
> Romance languages didn't translate well into rock so you have the soft
> muzak rock those countries created.
>
> On 11/05/2013 10:37 AM, TurquoiseB wrote:
>
>
> --- In FairfieldLife@yahoogroups.com, s3raphita wrote:
> >
> > Yep, but we were talking about British imitation rock so
> > Vince Taylor and Cliff Richard are two important pioneers
> > in the UK. I'm guessing one reason they never made a name
> > for themselves in the States is because Americans didn't
> > need second-rate copies of their own stars.
>
> Couldn't have said it better. :-)
>
> Plus, the music industry mechanism really wasn't in place
> to allow for mass distribution of non-US acts at that time.
> There was no market perceived for it, so it didn't really
> exist.
>
> BTW, you find the same thing in France, but for another
> reason -- the language difference. Plus the fact that rock
> sounds *terrible* in French. Rap, it can handle, but rock,
> fuggedaboudit. In France, old pop stars like Francoise
> Hardy are still minor goddesses, but old rockers like
> Johnny Hallyday are major Gods, right up there with
> Thor. :-)
>
> > The Beatles probably made it because they came along
> > after rock 'n' roll's heyday and added enough original
> > touches of their own to make it more appealing than
> > the saccharine-sweet pop that had by then become the
> > norm.
>
> Tell it, sista. The US pop music scene was really in its
> doldrums before the Beatles. Many of the people who
> had grown up on it had gravitated to folk music because
> there was *energy* there, and there t'weren't none in
> pop.
>
> Then the Beatles arrived, preceded by a wave of near-
> hysterical media hype. I'm honestly not sure which con-
> tributed more to the Beatles' success in the US -- their
> talent, or the hype. I lean to the latter. See enough TV
> stories (or, in those days, movie News trailers before
> your movie) of star-struck Beatles fans and your young
> impressionable mind has already been pre-programmed
> to love them when you see them live.
>
> Still, it *was* a phenomenon in the US, Beatlemania.
> By the time it struck, I was a full-fledged folkie, both
> listening to and performing the "real music," folk
> music performed by upscale white artists. :-) So they
> had to drag me away from my Dylan and Baez and
> the like to listen to a Beatles album. And to be honest,
> I wasn't knocked out at first by the sound. Even then,
> I was more fascinated by the *trend*, the fact that
> so many were so gaga over them.
>
> It took the Rolling Stones to knock my socks off. :-)
>
>
>
>
>
>    
>
>
>

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